Masculine Touch and Fear of False Sexual Accusations: A Gap in Nursing Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150778
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Masculine Touch and Fear of False Sexual Accusations: A Gap in Nursing Education
Abstract:
Masculine Touch and Fear of False Sexual Accusations: A Gap in Nursing Education
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:O'Lynn, Chad, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman
Title:Adjunct Assistant Professor
Objectives: To ascertain whether male nursing students received education and guidance on the appropriate use of touch, and whether these men fear false sexual accusations. Design: Secondary analysis of data from a previous exploratory study examining gender-based barriers for male nursing students. Sample: 111 male graduates of 90 different nursing programs in the USA. 38% of the men had graduated within the past ten years. Method: Data were collected from a mailed survey. Non-parametric statistics were used for analysis. Findings: 62% of the sample did not receive instruction on the appropriate use of touch. This percentage was statistically equal for both recent and distant graduates. 66% of the sample stated this issue is important. 34% of the sample expressed nervousness that they would be accused of sexual inappropriateness when providing intimate care as students. However, 45% of those who graduated in the past ten years felt this nervousness as students. 90% of the sample stated this issue is important. Of the 39 gender barriers examined in the original study, nervousness of false accusations was ranked the second most important barrier for men in nursing education. Qualitative comments provided by the sample reflected the frustration of men on these issues. Conclusion: An unacceptable number of men do not receive instruction on appropriate touch, an educational deficit that has not changed over the years. With increased media attention on litigation of sexual harassment and abuse, male students are increasingly nervous of false accusations of sexual inappropriateness. Implications: Educators have a responsibility to provide men with quality preparation for professional practice. Lack of attention to the issue of appropriate touch adds to the unique stress men experience as they negotiate gender bias within the nursing profession. Several strategies are provided to help reduce stress men experience regarding this topic.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMasculine Touch and Fear of False Sexual Accusations: A Gap in Nursing Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150778-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Masculine Touch and Fear of False Sexual Accusations: A Gap in Nursing Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">O'Lynn, Chad, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Adjunct Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">colynn@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: To ascertain whether male nursing students received education and guidance on the appropriate use of touch, and whether these men fear false sexual accusations. Design: Secondary analysis of data from a previous exploratory study examining gender-based barriers for male nursing students. Sample: 111 male graduates of 90 different nursing programs in the USA. 38% of the men had graduated within the past ten years. Method: Data were collected from a mailed survey. Non-parametric statistics were used for analysis. Findings: 62% of the sample did not receive instruction on the appropriate use of touch. This percentage was statistically equal for both recent and distant graduates. 66% of the sample stated this issue is important. 34% of the sample expressed nervousness that they would be accused of sexual inappropriateness when providing intimate care as students. However, 45% of those who graduated in the past ten years felt this nervousness as students. 90% of the sample stated this issue is important. Of the 39 gender barriers examined in the original study, nervousness of false accusations was ranked the second most important barrier for men in nursing education. Qualitative comments provided by the sample reflected the frustration of men on these issues. Conclusion: An unacceptable number of men do not receive instruction on appropriate touch, an educational deficit that has not changed over the years. With increased media attention on litigation of sexual harassment and abuse, male students are increasingly nervous of false accusations of sexual inappropriateness. Implications: Educators have a responsibility to provide men with quality preparation for professional practice. Lack of attention to the issue of appropriate touch adds to the unique stress men experience as they negotiate gender bias within the nursing profession. Several strategies are provided to help reduce stress men experience regarding this topic.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:42:37Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:42:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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