2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150783
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Investigating the Suicide Care Process in Psychiatric Wards in Taiwan
Abstract:
Investigating the Suicide Care Process in Psychiatric Wards in Taiwan
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Sun, Fan-Ko, PhD, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Ulster
Co-Authors:Ann Long, PhD; Jennifer Boore, N/A
Objective: This study explored psychiatric nurses’ (n=15) and patients’ (n=15) perceptions of the care proffered to suicidal patients in three psychiatric hospitals in Taiwan. The main aim of this study was to develop a suicide care theory that will advance the nursing care provided to people with suicidal ideas and those who attempt suicide. Design: Qualitative research using Grounded Theory was used (Strauss & Corbin, 1998), which meant that the data collection processes continued until theoretical saturation of the data generated had been reached. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: In keeping with one of the key axioms of Grounded Theory, theoretical sampling was utilised. A total of 15 psychiatric nurses and 15 patients who had suicidal ideas or had attempted suicide were interviewed and observed. Participants were accessed from two large medical center teaching hospitals and one specialist mental hospital in the south of Taiwan. The data collection process was conducted from January 2003 until June 2003. The study will be completed in March, 2004. Methods: As this was qualitative research participant observation and semi-structured interviews were used as the data collection strategies. Data Analysis: Data were analysed using open, axial and selective coding (Strauss & Corbin, 1998) and the NUD*IST software programme. Findings: The core category that emerged from the data collected was: “safe and compassionate care via the channel of the therapeutic relationship”. Other key categories linked to and embraced within this core-category were: the holistic assessment of suicidal patients; providing protection; providing basic care and providing advanced care. Implications: The findings from this study have implications for further research, management and practice as they identify the needs of patients who have attempted suicide and, also the education and training needs of nurses. Further, they highlight the nursing profession’s obligation to advance the nursing care of suicidal patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInvestigating the Suicide Care Process in Psychiatric Wards in Taiwanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150783-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Investigating the Suicide Care Process in Psychiatric Wards in Taiwan</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sun, Fan-Ko, PhD, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Ulster</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sunfanko@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ann Long, PhD; Jennifer Boore, N/A</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This study explored psychiatric nurses&rsquo; (n=15) and patients&rsquo; (n=15) perceptions of the care proffered to suicidal patients in three psychiatric hospitals in Taiwan. The main aim of this study was to develop a suicide care theory that will advance the nursing care provided to people with suicidal ideas and those who attempt suicide. Design: Qualitative research using Grounded Theory was used (Strauss &amp; Corbin, 1998), which meant that the data collection processes continued until theoretical saturation of the data generated had been reached. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: In keeping with one of the key axioms of Grounded Theory, theoretical sampling was utilised. A total of 15 psychiatric nurses and 15 patients who had suicidal ideas or had attempted suicide were interviewed and observed. Participants were accessed from two large medical center teaching hospitals and one specialist mental hospital in the south of Taiwan. The data collection process was conducted from January 2003 until June 2003. The study will be completed in March, 2004. Methods: As this was qualitative research participant observation and semi-structured interviews were used as the data collection strategies. Data Analysis: Data were analysed using open, axial and selective coding (Strauss &amp; Corbin, 1998) and the NUD*IST software programme. Findings: The core category that emerged from the data collected was: &ldquo;safe and compassionate care via the channel of the therapeutic relationship&rdquo;. Other key categories linked to and embraced within this core-category were: the holistic assessment of suicidal patients; providing protection; providing basic care and providing advanced care. Implications: The findings from this study have implications for further research, management and practice as they identify the needs of patients who have attempted suicide and, also the education and training needs of nurses. Further, they highlight the nursing profession&rsquo;s obligation to advance the nursing care of suicidal patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:42:46Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:42:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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