An Evidence-Based Theoretical Model to Explain the Impact of the COPE Program on Young Hospitalized/Critically Ill Children and Their Parents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150789
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Evidence-Based Theoretical Model to Explain the Impact of the COPE Program on Young Hospitalized/Critically Ill Children and Their Parents
Abstract:
An Evidence-Based Theoretical Model to Explain the Impact of the COPE Program on Young Hospitalized/Critically Ill Children and Their Parents
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 21, 2004
Author:Feinstein, Nancy Fischbeck, RNC, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Rochester
Title:senior research associate
There is a paucity of empirical evidence to support the mechanisms through which interventions work to improve outcomes in hospitalized/critically ill children and their parents. These explanations are crucial for healthcare providers to translate research findings into clinical practice. Therefore, the purpose of this presentation is describe an evidence-based theory, comprised of self-regulation theory, control theory, and the emotional contagion hypothesis, to explain the processes through which the COPE intervention program exerts its effects on the mental health/coping outcomes of hospitalized and critically ill young children and their mothers. Analysis of proposed mediating variables from two randomized controlled trials that tested the effects of the COPE program on the mental health/coping outcomes of hospitalized and critically ill children and their mothers will be presented. Findings indicate that maternal beliefs are especially potent in mediating the effects of the COPE program on maternal coping outcomes. In addition, evidence supports that maternal coping outcomes (i.e., maternal anxiety and participation in their children’s care) directly influence the coping outcomes of young hospitalized and critically ill children. Empirical evidence was generated to support the proposed theoretical model and explain the processes through which the COPE intervention produces positive outcomes for mothers and children. Explaining the effects of how interventions work to improve outcomes in hospitalized/ critically ill children and parents will facilitate the translation of intervention programs into clinical practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Evidence-Based Theoretical Model to Explain the Impact of the COPE Program on Young Hospitalized/Critically Ill Children and Their Parentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150789-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Evidence-Based Theoretical Model to Explain the Impact of the COPE Program on Young Hospitalized/Critically Ill Children and Their Parents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 21, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Feinstein, Nancy Fischbeck, RNC, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Rochester</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">senior research associate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nancy_feinstein@urmc.rochester.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">There is a paucity of empirical evidence to support the mechanisms through which interventions work to improve outcomes in hospitalized/critically ill children and their parents. These explanations are crucial for healthcare providers to translate research findings into clinical practice. Therefore, the purpose of this presentation is describe an evidence-based theory, comprised of self-regulation theory, control theory, and the emotional contagion hypothesis, to explain the processes through which the COPE intervention program exerts its effects on the mental health/coping outcomes of hospitalized and critically ill young children and their mothers. Analysis of proposed mediating variables from two randomized controlled trials that tested the effects of the COPE program on the mental health/coping outcomes of hospitalized and critically ill children and their mothers will be presented. Findings indicate that maternal beliefs are especially potent in mediating the effects of the COPE program on maternal coping outcomes. In addition, evidence supports that maternal coping outcomes (i.e., maternal anxiety and participation in their children&rsquo;s care) directly influence the coping outcomes of young hospitalized and critically ill children. Empirical evidence was generated to support the proposed theoretical model and explain the processes through which the COPE intervention produces positive outcomes for mothers and children. Explaining the effects of how interventions work to improve outcomes in hospitalized/ critically ill children and parents will facilitate the translation of intervention programs into clinical practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:42:56Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-21en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:42:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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