2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150801
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Disparities and Acutely Mentally Ill Patients in Hawaii
Abstract:
Health Disparities and Acutely Mentally Ill Patients in Hawaii
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Anders, Robert, DrPH, APRN, CS, CNAA
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas at El Paso
Title:Professor and Associate Dean
Co-Authors:Tom Olson, PhD, APRN, BC
The topic of health disparities and acute mental illness in Hawaii's ethnically diverse population is poorly understood. This study addressed this knowledge gap by exploring differences in personal characteristics, mental health, functional health, treatment and care involving Caucasians, Asians, and Pacific Islanders who were hospitalized for an acute mental illness in Hawaii during a two-year period ending in 2003. A total of 138 subjects were enrolled in the study, including 48 who identified themselves as being primarily of Asian background, 43 who identified themselves as being primarily of Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander and/or Mixed ôLocalö background, and 47 whose primary identification was Caucasian. These totals included 62 females and 76 males. The methodology involved assessment of mental health status within 48 hours of admission and at the time of discharge using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS); functional assessment at discharge using the Short Form 36 Health Survey Version Two (SF-36v2); assessment of patient satisfaction at discharge using the Perceptions of Care instrument (POC); and a 30-day post-hospitalization retrospective record review using the Psychiatric Records Abstract Instrument (PRAI). Analysis included both descriptive and inferential statistics. The findings revealed a high level of consistency in diagnosis, BPRS change scores, functional health scores and patient satisfaction between members of the three ethnic/racial groups. Statistically significant differences were found between the various ratings and assessments on the basis of gender and socioeconomic status. In addition to the primary research results, the study highlighted several secondary, yet important research challenges. These challenges included balancing divergent requests from multiple human subjects committees, implementing competency testing, addressing numerous personnel concerns, and carefully reviewing how to best define ethnicity within an increasingly mixed ethnic community.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Disparities and Acutely Mentally Ill Patients in Hawaiien_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150801-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Disparities and Acutely Mentally Ill Patients in Hawaii</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anders, Robert, DrPH, APRN, CS, CNAA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas at El Paso</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tolson@utep.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tom Olson, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The topic of health disparities and acute mental illness in Hawaii's ethnically diverse population is poorly understood. This study addressed this knowledge gap by exploring differences in personal characteristics, mental health, functional health, treatment and care involving Caucasians, Asians, and Pacific Islanders who were hospitalized for an acute mental illness in Hawaii during a two-year period ending in 2003. A total of 138 subjects were enrolled in the study, including 48 who identified themselves as being primarily of Asian background, 43 who identified themselves as being primarily of Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander and/or Mixed &ocirc;Local&ouml; background, and 47 whose primary identification was Caucasian. These totals included 62 females and 76 males. The methodology involved assessment of mental health status within 48 hours of admission and at the time of discharge using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS); functional assessment at discharge using the Short Form 36 Health Survey Version Two (SF-36v2); assessment of patient satisfaction at discharge using the Perceptions of Care instrument (POC); and a 30-day post-hospitalization retrospective record review using the Psychiatric Records Abstract Instrument (PRAI). Analysis included both descriptive and inferential statistics. The findings revealed a high level of consistency in diagnosis, BPRS change scores, functional health scores and patient satisfaction between members of the three ethnic/racial groups. Statistically significant differences were found between the various ratings and assessments on the basis of gender and socioeconomic status. In addition to the primary research results, the study highlighted several secondary, yet important research challenges. These challenges included balancing divergent requests from multiple human subjects committees, implementing competency testing, addressing numerous personnel concerns, and carefully reviewing how to best define ethnicity within an increasingly mixed ethnic community.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:43:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:43:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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