Cognitive, Nutritional, and Functional Decline Associated With Hospitalization in Older Taiwanese Patients Admitted for Med-Surgical Services

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150803
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cognitive, Nutritional, and Functional Decline Associated With Hospitalization in Older Taiwanese Patients Admitted for Med-Surgical Services
Abstract:
Cognitive, Nutritional, and Functional Decline Associated With Hospitalization in Older Taiwanese Patients Admitted for Med-Surgical Services
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Chen, Cheryl Chia-Hui, DNSc, GNP
P.I. Institution Name:National Taiwan University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Guan-Hua Huang, PhD; Yueh-Chan Hung, RN, BSN; Yu-Lun Liu, MS
Background and Aims: Numerous studies have shown that most markers of cognition, nutrition, and function deteriorate steadily during hospitalization and such deteriorations significantly affect clinical outcomes. The aim of this prospective study was to examine the independent and interactive effects of acute illness on the course and magnitude of cognitive, nutritional, and functional decline in older Taiwanese patients. Methods: The study population consisted of 114 subjects who completed the comprehensive geriatric assessment at admission - most were older (74.2¦"4.6years) and less educated (85% <=2 years schooling). Subjects who had a length of stay longer than 5 days were assessed again before discharge (n=70). The cognitive, nutritional, and functional status were assessed alone with demographics, comorbidities, medication, oral health, social support, depressive symptoms, laboratory variables, and treatment-related factors (NPO days, length of stay, admission diagnosis, and cost of care) by a trained research nurses. Results: The data indicated that cognitive, nutritional, and ADL functional impairments occurred frequently, in approximately 10-47% of older hospitalized patients at admission. Although cognitive status measured by the Mini-Mental Sate Examination (MMSE) was slightly improved during the course of hospitalization (from 25.97 to 26.34), the nutritional status measured by the Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA) and functional status measured by the Barthal Index were declined significantly, compared to the admission baseline (t=-3.54, p=.0007, t=-10.07, p<.000, respectively). Predictive model for nutrition and function decline associated with hospitalization was developed. Significant predictors included depressive symptoms, length of stay, number of medication, cognitive impairment, and weight loss in the prior six months. Nursing Implication: In hospital setting, nurses are ideally positioned to screen for cognition, nutrition, and function decline. Knowledge about the predictors of such declines can advance nursing sciences and might lead to targeted, cost-effective interventions for older hospitalized Taiwanese patients who admitted for medical and surgical services.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCognitive, Nutritional, and Functional Decline Associated With Hospitalization in Older Taiwanese Patients Admitted for Med-Surgical Servicesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150803-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cognitive, Nutritional, and Functional Decline Associated With Hospitalization in Older Taiwanese Patients Admitted for Med-Surgical Services</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chen, Cheryl Chia-Hui, DNSc, GNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">National Taiwan University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cheryl.chen@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Guan-Hua Huang, PhD; Yueh-Chan Hung, RN, BSN; Yu-Lun Liu, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and Aims: Numerous studies have shown that most markers of cognition, nutrition, and function deteriorate steadily during hospitalization and such deteriorations significantly affect clinical outcomes. The aim of this prospective study was to examine the independent and interactive effects of acute illness on the course and magnitude of cognitive, nutritional, and functional decline in older Taiwanese patients. Methods: The study population consisted of 114 subjects who completed the comprehensive geriatric assessment at admission - most were older (74.2&brvbar;&quot;4.6years) and less educated (85% &lt;=2 years schooling). Subjects who had a length of stay longer than 5 days were assessed again before discharge (n=70). The cognitive, nutritional, and functional status were assessed alone with demographics, comorbidities, medication, oral health, social support, depressive symptoms, laboratory variables, and treatment-related factors (NPO days, length of stay, admission diagnosis, and cost of care) by a trained research nurses. Results: The data indicated that cognitive, nutritional, and ADL functional impairments occurred frequently, in approximately 10-47% of older hospitalized patients at admission. Although cognitive status measured by the Mini-Mental Sate Examination (MMSE) was slightly improved during the course of hospitalization (from 25.97 to 26.34), the nutritional status measured by the Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA) and functional status measured by the Barthal Index were declined significantly, compared to the admission baseline (t=-3.54, p=.0007, t=-10.07, p&lt;.000, respectively). Predictive model for nutrition and function decline associated with hospitalization was developed. Significant predictors included depressive symptoms, length of stay, number of medication, cognitive impairment, and weight loss in the prior six months. Nursing Implication: In hospital setting, nurses are ideally positioned to screen for cognition, nutrition, and function decline. Knowledge about the predictors of such declines can advance nursing sciences and might lead to targeted, cost-effective interventions for older hospitalized Taiwanese patients who admitted for medical and surgical services.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:43:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:43:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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