Strength and Comfort of Rituals in Midlife Women Experiencing Acute Myocardial Infarction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150817
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strength and Comfort of Rituals in Midlife Women Experiencing Acute Myocardial Infarction
Abstract:
Strength and Comfort of Rituals in Midlife Women Experiencing Acute Myocardial Infarction
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kamm Steigelman, Lucia, RN, PhD, MBA
P.I. Institution Name:Kennesaw State University
Title:Associate Professor, Distinguished Scholar in Women's Wellness
Co-Authors:Laura P. Kimble, PhD, RN; Richard Sowell, RN, PhD; Annette Bairan, PhD, APRN, BC, FNP; Sandra B. Dunbar, RN, DSN, FAAN
Background: Little is known about coping in midlife women following AMI. Historically, in the 1960s and 1970s coping following AMI has been studied in samples primarily of males. In depression, use of religious and family rituals were reported as coping behaviors in patients. Moderate depressive states are reported in 18% of patients following AMI. After surgery, lack of strength and comfort from religion was associated with risk of death. The purpose of this descriptive study is to guide the development of recovery interventions for midlife women following AMI by describing relationships and activities that provide strength and comfort and identifying any correlations with depression. Methods and Data Analysis: The convenience sample included 59 midlife women, mean of 52.8 years +/-8.48 years, 32% African-American, 54% high school graduates or less, 61% with family incomes less than $40,000. 89% lived with someone. Data were collected approximately one week following AMI. Women reported relationships and rituals and depression status (BDI-II). Data were examined using descriptive statistics and correlations. Outcomes: 22 (37%) participants reported symptoms of depression, significantly negative correlations were found between depression and the love, strength and comfort of friends and family. Women reported strength and comfort from religion (n=46, 78%) and from friends and family (n=47, 80%). Most frequently reported activities providing strength and comfort are: family get-togethers, being with family, and church. Discussion: Following AMI, women's responses imply the tailoring of recovery interventions to include participating in family get-togethers and engaging in already established religious rituals. Results support investigating the placement of AMI recovery interventions for women within parish nursing programs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrength and Comfort of Rituals in Midlife Women Experiencing Acute Myocardial Infarctionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150817-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Strength and Comfort of Rituals in Midlife Women Experiencing Acute Myocardial Infarction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kamm Steigelman, Lucia, RN, PhD, MBA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kennesaw State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor, Distinguished Scholar in Women's Wellness</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lucia_kamm-steigelman@emory.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Laura P. Kimble, PhD, RN; Richard Sowell, RN, PhD; Annette Bairan, PhD, APRN, BC, FNP; Sandra B. Dunbar, RN, DSN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Little is known about coping in midlife women following AMI. Historically, in the 1960s and 1970s coping following AMI has been studied in samples primarily of males. In depression, use of religious and family rituals were reported as coping behaviors in patients. Moderate depressive states are reported in 18% of patients following AMI. After surgery, lack of strength and comfort from religion was associated with risk of death. The purpose of this descriptive study is to guide the development of recovery interventions for midlife women following AMI by describing relationships and activities that provide strength and comfort and identifying any correlations with depression. Methods and Data Analysis: The convenience sample included 59 midlife women, mean of 52.8 years +/-8.48 years, 32% African-American, 54% high school graduates or less, 61% with family incomes less than $40,000. 89% lived with someone. Data were collected approximately one week following AMI. Women reported relationships and rituals and depression status (BDI-II). Data were examined using descriptive statistics and correlations. Outcomes: 22 (37%) participants reported symptoms of depression, significantly negative correlations were found between depression and the love, strength and comfort of friends and family. Women reported strength and comfort from religion (n=46, 78%) and from friends and family (n=47, 80%). Most frequently reported activities providing strength and comfort are: family get-togethers, being with family, and church. Discussion: Following AMI, women's responses imply the tailoring of recovery interventions to include participating in family get-togethers and engaging in already established religious rituals. Results support investigating the placement of AMI recovery interventions for women within parish nursing programs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:43:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:43:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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