A Study Categorizing Workflow Interruptions for RNs in a Level One Trauma Center

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150819
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Study Categorizing Workflow Interruptions for RNs in a Level One Trauma Center
Abstract:
A Study Categorizing Workflow Interruptions for RNs in a Level One Trauma Center
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Brixey, Juliana J., MSN, MPH, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Science Center - Houston
Title:Doctoral Student
Co-Authors:Todd R. Johnson, PhD; David Robinson, MD, MS, FACEP; Jiajie Zhang, PhD; Zhihua Tang, PhD; James P. Turley, PhD, RN
INTRODUCTION High-risk industries, such as nuclear power plants and aviation, have studied how interruptions contribute to accidents and errors. However, little is known about how interruptions affect tasks performed by nurses. For the purpose of this study, an interruption was defined as a ôbreak in a person's performance of an activity when that break was initiated by a source internal or external to the person and resulted in the suspension of the initial task, or the performance of an unplanned task with the assumption of resuming the initial task upon completion of the new taskö. The aim of this study was to identify interruptions experienced by RNs working in a Level One Trauma Center. METHODS Study Design: A non-participatory ethnographic study. Subjects: A convenience sample of RNs with a least six months experience in the emergency department were asked to participate. Each observation session lasted a minimum of four hours but did not exceed twelve hours. Study Protocol: Observers typically worked in teams of two recording observations using a semi-structured field note. Each time stamped observation was transcribed into an Excel spreadsheet with additional analysis performed using MacShapa. Data Analysis: Categories for interruptions were developed using Grounded Theory. Two coders analyzed the data for agreement to determine a percent agreement score. RESULTS Eight nurses were consented and seven were observed for a total of 35 hours. One nurse was excused from participation after a change in responsibilities. Six interruption categories were identified. One hundred eleven interruptions were identified in which the subject was the recipient of an interruption. Coder agreement was in excess of 85 %. DISCUSSION Grounded Theory techniques were useful to identify and classify interruptions experienced by emergency nurses. Results indicate that about three interruptions occur per hour supporting the claim that healthcare is interrupt driven.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Study Categorizing Workflow Interruptions for RNs in a Level One Trauma Centeren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150819-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Study Categorizing Workflow Interruptions for RNs in a Level One Trauma Center</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brixey, Juliana J., MSN, MPH, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Science Center - Houston</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Juliana.J.Brixey@uth.tmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Todd R. Johnson, PhD; David Robinson, MD, MS, FACEP; Jiajie Zhang, PhD; Zhihua Tang, PhD; James P. Turley, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">INTRODUCTION High-risk industries, such as nuclear power plants and aviation, have studied how interruptions contribute to accidents and errors. However, little is known about how interruptions affect tasks performed by nurses. For the purpose of this study, an interruption was defined as a &ocirc;break in a person's performance of an activity when that break was initiated by a source internal or external to the person and resulted in the suspension of the initial task, or the performance of an unplanned task with the assumption of resuming the initial task upon completion of the new task&ouml;. The aim of this study was to identify interruptions experienced by RNs working in a Level One Trauma Center. METHODS Study Design: A non-participatory ethnographic study. Subjects: A convenience sample of RNs with a least six months experience in the emergency department were asked to participate. Each observation session lasted a minimum of four hours but did not exceed twelve hours. Study Protocol: Observers typically worked in teams of two recording observations using a semi-structured field note. Each time stamped observation was transcribed into an Excel spreadsheet with additional analysis performed using MacShapa. Data Analysis: Categories for interruptions were developed using Grounded Theory. Two coders analyzed the data for agreement to determine a percent agreement score. RESULTS Eight nurses were consented and seven were observed for a total of 35 hours. One nurse was excused from participation after a change in responsibilities. Six interruption categories were identified. One hundred eleven interruptions were identified in which the subject was the recipient of an interruption. Coder agreement was in excess of 85 %. DISCUSSION Grounded Theory techniques were useful to identify and classify interruptions experienced by emergency nurses. Results indicate that about three interruptions occur per hour supporting the claim that healthcare is interrupt driven.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:43:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:43:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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