The Relationship Between Sleep Characteristics and Fatigue in Postpartum Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150825
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship Between Sleep Characteristics and Fatigue in Postpartum Women
Abstract:
The Relationship Between Sleep Characteristics and Fatigue in Postpartum Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Rychnovsky, Jacqueline D., PhD, RN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Naval Medical Center San Diego
Title:Nurse Researcher
Background and Purpose: Approximately 4 million women annually experience the birth of a child, and over 1 million women with a child under the age of one year return to the work force. In the postpartum period, mothers report feeling more fatigued than during pregnancy. Postpartum mothers report more sleep disturbance than fathers, and working women experience less sleep than required. The purpose of this descriptive, longitudinal study of 109 working women was to describe fatigue levels across the first 6-8 weeks postpartum, and to describe the relationship among sleep characteristics as they relate to fatigue levels. Sample and Methodology: The majority of the sample were married or partnered enlisted women in the U.S. Navy with a mean age of 25 years (¦5). Fatigue was measured using the Fatigue Continuum Form, an ordinal, 30-statement instrument. Maternal sleep was measured using the VSH Sleep Scale, a visual-analogue scale designed to subjectively measure 16 sleep characteristics that evaluate the concepts of sleep disturbance, sleep effectiveness, and sleep supplementation. Descriptive statistics and Pearsons r correlations were used to analyze the data. Institutional Review Board approval was received prior to study commencement. Findings: Women were found to be moderately fatigued across time, with no change in fatigue levels from 2 to 6-8 weeks postpartum. At the time delivery, and at 2-weeks and 6-weeks postpartum, fatigue correlated with fragmented sleep, sleep quality, sleep disturbance, and sleep effectiveness. Fatigue did not correlate at any point with length of sleep, sleep latency, or sleep supplementation. Future research and nursing interventions should focus on helping the postpartum mother improve sleep quality and effectiveness, and strive toward reducing disturbed sleep. Napping and sleeping longer hours do not appear to reduce postpartum fatigue.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship Between Sleep Characteristics and Fatigue in Postpartum Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150825-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship Between Sleep Characteristics and Fatigue in Postpartum Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rychnovsky, Jacqueline D., PhD, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Naval Medical Center San Diego</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Researcher</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jdrychnovsky@nmcsd.med.navy.mil</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and Purpose: Approximately 4 million women annually experience the birth of a child, and over 1 million women with a child under the age of one year return to the work force. In the postpartum period, mothers report feeling more fatigued than during pregnancy. Postpartum mothers report more sleep disturbance than fathers, and working women experience less sleep than required. The purpose of this descriptive, longitudinal study of 109 working women was to describe fatigue levels across the first 6-8 weeks postpartum, and to describe the relationship among sleep characteristics as they relate to fatigue levels. Sample and Methodology: The majority of the sample were married or partnered enlisted women in the U.S. Navy with a mean age of 25 years (&brvbar;5). Fatigue was measured using the Fatigue Continuum Form, an ordinal, 30-statement instrument. Maternal sleep was measured using the VSH Sleep Scale, a visual-analogue scale designed to subjectively measure 16 sleep characteristics that evaluate the concepts of sleep disturbance, sleep effectiveness, and sleep supplementation. Descriptive statistics and Pearsons r correlations were used to analyze the data. Institutional Review Board approval was received prior to study commencement. Findings: Women were found to be moderately fatigued across time, with no change in fatigue levels from 2 to 6-8 weeks postpartum. At the time delivery, and at 2-weeks and 6-weeks postpartum, fatigue correlated with fragmented sleep, sleep quality, sleep disturbance, and sleep effectiveness. Fatigue did not correlate at any point with length of sleep, sleep latency, or sleep supplementation. Future research and nursing interventions should focus on helping the postpartum mother improve sleep quality and effectiveness, and strive toward reducing disturbed sleep. Napping and sleeping longer hours do not appear to reduce postpartum fatigue.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:43:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:43:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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