Stories of Caring From the Receiving End: African Canadian Women's Perspective

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150833
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stories of Caring From the Receiving End: African Canadian Women's Perspective
Abstract:
Stories of Caring From the Receiving End: African Canadian Women's Perspective
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Etowa, Josephine B., RN, RM, IBCLC
P.I. Institution Name:Dalhousie university
In the recent past, nurses and other health care providers have been increasingly involved in identifying ways of addressing issues of culture and health within a variety of health discipline including, population health, mothers, babies and family health. This paper will discuss the findings of a research project that explored the childbirth experiences of African Canadian Women. The purpose of the study was to generate knowledge that would enable health care providers to work effectively with this population. Feminist participatory action research (PAR) methodology formed the guiding tenet for this study. The main sources of data collection were audio taped semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions. Eight African Canadian women between the ages of eighteen and forty participated in the research. Thematic analysis was used to identify the categories. The findings presented in this paper are: (1) supportive care, and (2) access to health care during the childbearing process. This study indicates the need for health care professionals to have the knowledge and understanding of the unique issues that affect ethno-racial minorities These Black women's experience is not a simple issue of race and class; rather it is a complex one and needs different approaches to address. The complexity of these issues is reflected in the way in which the women described their experiences with care providers. This paper will use Swanson (1993) theory of informed caring as a framework for describing these women's perceptions of caring behaviours demonstrated by their health care providers. It will conclude with some implications for nursing including how to work effectively across cultural boundaries.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStories of Caring From the Receiving End: African Canadian Women's Perspectiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150833-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stories of Caring From the Receiving End: African Canadian Women's Perspective</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Etowa, Josephine B., RN, RM, IBCLC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Dalhousie university</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">josephine.etowa@dal.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In the recent past, nurses and other health care providers have been increasingly involved in identifying ways of addressing issues of culture and health within a variety of health discipline including, population health, mothers, babies and family health. This paper will discuss the findings of a research project that explored the childbirth experiences of African Canadian Women. The purpose of the study was to generate knowledge that would enable health care providers to work effectively with this population. Feminist participatory action research (PAR) methodology formed the guiding tenet for this study. The main sources of data collection were audio taped semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions. Eight African Canadian women between the ages of eighteen and forty participated in the research. Thematic analysis was used to identify the categories. The findings presented in this paper are: (1) supportive care, and (2) access to health care during the childbearing process. This study indicates the need for health care professionals to have the knowledge and understanding of the unique issues that affect ethno-racial minorities These Black women's experience is not a simple issue of race and class; rather it is a complex one and needs different approaches to address. The complexity of these issues is reflected in the way in which the women described their experiences with care providers. This paper will use Swanson (1993) theory of informed caring as a framework for describing these women's perceptions of caring behaviours demonstrated by their health care providers. It will conclude with some implications for nursing including how to work effectively across cultural boundaries.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:44:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:44:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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