"Can Do?."Self-Efficacy in Self-Care Among Individuals with Heart Failure Plus Multiple Comorbid Conditions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150885
Type:
Presentation
Title:
"Can Do?."Self-Efficacy in Self-Care Among Individuals with Heart Failure Plus Multiple Comorbid Conditions
Abstract:
"Can Do?."Self-Efficacy in Self-Care Among Individuals with Heart Failure Plus Multiple Comorbid Conditions
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Dickson, Victoria Vaughan, PhD, RN, CRNP
P.I. Institution Name:New York University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Harleah G. Buck PhD, RN, CHPN, Post Doctoral Research Fellow and Barbara Riegel RN, CS, FAAN, Professor
[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose: Most heart failure (HF) patients report comorbid conditions. HF self-care requires medication and diet adherence, daily weight monitoring, and response to symptoms when they occur. Multiple comorbid conditions may lower self-efficacy in self-care and interfere with one's ability to manage HF. The purpose of this qualitative meta-analysis was to explore the influence of self-efficacy in HF self-care among individuals with HF plus another condition. 
Methods:  Using qualitative meta-analysis techniques, transcripts from three mixed methods studies investigating HF self-care (n=99) were re-examined to yield themes about self-efficacy in self-care and explore the influence of comorbid conditions on HF self-care. The Charlson Comorbidity Index (alpha=.89) identified comorbid conditions. Results: The sample was 74% Caucasian, 66% male, mean age of 59.6 (+/- 15) years. Most (79%) reported at least 2 chronic conditions. Diabetes was reported by 34%. Narrative accounts revealed that the most challenging skills were adherence to low salt diet, symptom monitoring, and differentiating symptoms of HF from other conditions. Self-efficacy emerged as an important variable that influenced self-care by shaping how individuals: 1) prioritized self-care of one condition over another ("I can tell if my sugar is up? don?t even have to stick myself") and 2) integrated multiple self-care instructions. Subjects who felt ill-prepared to carry out self-care lacked self-efficacy in HF self-care within the context of another condition. As a result of fragmented self-care instructions ("?diabetic nurse didn?t mention salt"), individuals selected one set of self-care behaviors to engage in, most often those in which they felt most confident ("?the diabetes diet?.that I can do?").  Conclusion: Individuals with multiple chronic conditions are vulnerable to poor self-care related to insufficient skill and poor self-efficacy.  Coaching interventions that integrate self-care requirements, focus on improving self-efficacy and develop skill in self-care across multiple chronic conditions are needed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title"Can Do?."Self-Efficacy in Self-Care Among Individuals with Heart Failure Plus Multiple Comorbid Conditionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150885-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">&quot;Can Do?.&quot;Self-Efficacy in Self-Care Among Individuals with Heart Failure Plus Multiple Comorbid Conditions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dickson, Victoria Vaughan, PhD, RN, CRNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">New York University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vdickson@nyu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Harleah G. Buck PhD, RN, CHPN, Post Doctoral Research Fellow and Barbara Riegel RN, CS, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose:&nbsp;Most heart failure (HF) patients report comorbid conditions. HF self-care requires medication and diet adherence, daily weight monitoring, and&nbsp;response to symptoms when they occur. Multiple comorbid conditions may lower self-efficacy in self-care and interfere with&nbsp;one's ability to manage HF. The purpose of this qualitative meta-analysis was to explore the influence of self-efficacy in HF self-care among individuals with HF plus another condition.&nbsp; <br/>Methods:&nbsp;&nbsp;Using&nbsp;qualitative meta-analysis techniques, transcripts from three mixed methods studies investigating HF self-care (n=99) were re-examined to yield themes about self-efficacy in self-care and explore the influence of comorbid conditions on HF self-care. The Charlson Comorbidity Index (alpha=.89) identified comorbid conditions. Results: The sample was 74% Caucasian, 66% male, mean age of 59.6 (+/- 15) years. Most (79%) reported at least 2 chronic conditions. Diabetes was reported by 34%. Narrative accounts revealed that the most challenging skills were adherence to low salt diet, symptom monitoring, and differentiating symptoms of HF from other conditions. Self-efficacy emerged as an important variable that influenced self-care by shaping how individuals: 1) prioritized self-care of one condition over another (&quot;I can tell if my sugar is up? don?t even have to stick myself&quot;) and 2) integrated multiple self-care instructions. Subjects who felt ill-prepared to carry out self-care lacked self-efficacy in HF self-care within the context of another condition. As a result of fragmented self-care instructions (&quot;?diabetic nurse didn?t mention salt&quot;), individuals selected one set of self-care behaviors to engage in, most often those in which they felt most confident (&quot;?the diabetes diet?.that I can do?&quot;). &nbsp;Conclusion:&nbsp;Individuals with multiple chronic conditions are vulnerable to poor self-care related to insufficient skill and poor self-efficacy.&nbsp; Coaching interventions that integrate self-care requirements, focus on improving self-efficacy and develop skill in self-care across multiple chronic conditions are needed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:45:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:45:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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