2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150895
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hospice Readiness in a Population of Palliative Care Patients
Abstract:
Hospice Readiness in a Population of Palliative Care Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Houser, Janet, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Regis University
Title:Associate Dean for Research
Co-Authors:Julie MacCluskey BSN, MSN, Nurse Practitioner, Grant Administrator
[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose: The aim of this evaluation study was to describe the reasons that palliative care patients eligible for hospice were unwilling to consider it.
Methods:  Providers in an urban palliative care service recorded hospice eligibility in three categories:  Not hospice eligible; eligible and ready for hospice; and eligible but not ready for hospice. The providers also recorded, for those who were judged eligible but not ready, "By whose assessment" and the reason for lack of readiness.  Data were collected from 755 patients. Descriptive statistics were applied to determine elements of readiness.
Results: 51.9% of the palliative care patients in this sample were ineligible for hospice.  Only 6.4% were ready for hospice at the time they become eligible; the remaining 42% were eligible but not ready. Most commonly, it was the family's perception that the patient was not ready for hospice.  The most common reasons for resisting hospice admission were related to hope - the patient and their family wanted to exhaust all treatments prior to entering hospice, because hospice was viewed as "giving up." A strong reason for resisting hospice admission was the desire - often on recommendation of the physician, that the patient would be more comfortable if they continued palliative treatments, most commonly palliative chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and blood transfusions. A small proportion of patients resisted hospice out of denial of their illness; 10% want to believe that their illness is not terminal. 4% of the time the attending physician was not sure if the patient's condition was terminal.
 Conclusion: Less than half of those who are in palliative care are eligible for hospice. Patients and their families often have legitimate reasons for resisting the move from palliative care to hospice. Understanding these reasons can help the nurse assist these patients in determining end of life goals.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHospice Readiness in a Population of Palliative Care Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150895-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hospice Readiness in a Population of Palliative Care Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Houser, Janet, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Regis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean for Research</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jhouser@regis.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Julie MacCluskey BSN, MSN, Nurse Practitioner, Grant Administrator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose: The aim of this evaluation study was to describe the reasons that palliative care patients eligible for hospice were unwilling to consider it.<br/>Methods:&nbsp; Providers in an urban palliative care service recorded hospice eligibility in three categories:&nbsp; Not hospice eligible; eligible and ready for hospice; and eligible but not ready for hospice. The providers also recorded, for those who were judged eligible but not ready, &quot;By whose assessment&quot; and the reason for lack of readiness. &nbsp;Data were collected from 755 patients. Descriptive statistics were applied to determine elements of readiness. <br/>Results: 51.9% of the palliative care patients in this sample were ineligible for hospice.&nbsp; Only 6.4% were ready for hospice at the time they become eligible; the remaining 42% were eligible but not ready. Most commonly, it was the family's perception that the patient was not ready for hospice.&nbsp; The most common reasons for resisting hospice admission were related to hope - the patient and their family wanted to exhaust all treatments prior to entering hospice, because hospice was viewed as &quot;giving up.&quot; A strong reason for resisting hospice admission was the desire - often on recommendation of the physician, that the patient would be more comfortable if they continued palliative treatments, most commonly palliative chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and blood transfusions. A small proportion of patients resisted hospice out of denial of their illness; 10% want to believe that their illness is not terminal. 4% of the time the attending physician was not sure if the patient's condition was terminal. <br/>&nbsp;Conclusion: Less than half of those who are in palliative care are eligible for hospice. Patients and their families often have legitimate reasons for resisting the move from palliative care to hospice. Understanding these reasons can help the nurse assist these patients in determining end of life goals.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:45:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:45:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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