9.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150908
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Barriers to Humane End-of-Life Care for Dying Prison Inmates
Abstract:
Barriers to Humane End-of-Life Care for Dying Prison Inmates
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Loeb, Susan J., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The Pennsylvania State University
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing
Co-Authors:Janice Penrod PhD, RN, Associate Professor of Nursing
Carol A. Smith DSN, RN, MSN, CRNP, FNAP, Associate Professor
Pamela C. Spigelmyer APRN, BC, CNS, CSN, Research Assistant
Christopher Hollenbeak PhD, Associate Professor
[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose:  To highlight the contextual challenges to providing quality end-of-life care to inmate populations in six distinct state correctional institutions in a Northeastern US state.
Methods:  In order to build understanding of the inside world of prison health care, qualitative methods were used to explore the perceived barriers to quality end-of-life care reported by 176 employees at six state correctional institutions. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with personnel who were involved in some aspect of end-of-life care, including:  health care; chaplaincy; security; and counseling and coordination staff. Content and thematic analytic techniques were applied by the research team.
Results:  Concerns over maintaining a balance between care and security were common. Caring staff members expressed a need to withhold from offering supportive touch or extra time beyond mandated tasks to dying inmates for fear of being perceived by peers or superiors as fraternizing with the dying inmates. While nurses held images of a ?good death, many referenced the constraints of prison life as impediments to humane death in prison. The availability of special foods and pain management practices varied across the six prisons. The isolating environment of the prison infirmary was cited as a hindrance to a peaceful death. Special dispensation from the chain of command was required for family visits of the dying, whether in prison or hospital. Visits from inmate buddies to those dying in the prison infirmary also required administrative approvals. While some institutions facilitated death vigils by inmate volunteers, others prohibited the practice due to perceived security threats.  Similarly, opportunities for memorializing the recently deceased varied widely across the six correctional institutions.
Conclusion: Despite variation in the EOL services offered at the six prisons; the everyday dilemmas were commonly experienced. Nurses serve in instrumental roles that could change the course of EOL care for dying inmates.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBarriers to Humane End-of-Life Care for Dying Prison Inmatesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150908-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Barriers to Humane End-of-Life Care for Dying Prison Inmates</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Loeb, Susan J., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Pennsylvania State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">SVL100@PSU.EDU</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Janice Penrod PhD, RN, Associate Professor of Nursing<br/>Carol A. Smith DSN, RN, MSN, CRNP, FNAP, Associate Professor<br/>Pamela C. Spigelmyer APRN, BC, CNS, CSN, Research Assistant<br/>Christopher Hollenbeak PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose:&nbsp; To highlight the contextual challenges to providing quality end-of-life care to inmate populations in six distinct state correctional institutions in a Northeastern US state. <br/>Methods:&nbsp; In order to build understanding of the inside world of prison health care, qualitative methods were used to explore the perceived barriers to quality end-of-life care reported by 176 employees at six state correctional institutions. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with personnel who were involved in some aspect of end-of-life care, including: &nbsp;health care; chaplaincy; security; and counseling and coordination staff. Content and thematic analytic techniques were applied by the research team. <br/>Results:&nbsp; Concerns over maintaining a balance between care and security were common. Caring staff members expressed a need to withhold from offering supportive touch or extra time beyond mandated tasks to dying inmates for fear of being perceived by peers or superiors as fraternizing with the dying inmates. While nurses held images of a ?good death, many referenced the constraints of prison life as impediments to humane death in prison. The availability of special foods and pain management practices varied across the six prisons. The isolating environment of the prison infirmary was cited as a hindrance to a peaceful death. Special dispensation from the chain of command was required for family visits of the dying, whether in prison or hospital. Visits from inmate buddies to those dying in the prison infirmary also required administrative approvals. While some institutions facilitated death vigils by inmate volunteers, others prohibited the practice due to perceived security threats.&nbsp; Similarly, opportunities for memorializing the recently deceased varied widely across the six correctional institutions. <br/>Conclusion: Despite variation in the EOL services offered at the six prisons; the everyday dilemmas were commonly experienced. Nurses serve in instrumental roles that could change the course of EOL care for dying inmates.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:46:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:46:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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