Evidence-Based Nursing Education: Effective Use of Instructional Design and Human Simulation to Enhance Knowledge Transfer in Undergraduate Nursing Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150927
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evidence-Based Nursing Education: Effective Use of Instructional Design and Human Simulation to Enhance Knowledge Transfer in Undergraduate Nursing Students
Abstract:
Evidence-Based Nursing Education: Effective Use of Instructional Design and Human Simulation to Enhance Knowledge Transfer in Undergraduate Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Robinson, Bridget K., PhD, MSN, RN, RRT
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Alabama
Title:Assistant Professor
[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] As a profession, nursing is considered as both an art and a science based discipline. The art of nursing which is often likened to a ?gut feeling? or ?intuition? is an abstract concept that is not easily quantified and near impossible to teach. Although abstract, intuition is cited as the integral factor in preventing critical patient events. It is known the nursing intuition is enhanced with experience. Experience has been recognized as a key component to transforming the novice nurse to expert status. However, there are times when clinical instructors must forgo valuable teachable moments to ensure patient safety. Additionally, curriculum requirements and student/instructor ratios often interfere with the undergraduate nursing students? opportunity for exposure to the patient setting prior to graduating. The simulated clinical setting presents a useful teaching strategy that overcomes these educational barriers. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight the evidence that supports the use of a user-centered instructional design towards incorporating human simulation into undergraduate nursing education. An educational strategy that enhances knowledge transfer, facilitates competence, and promotes safe practice among undergraduate nursing students.
    Although human simulation has been established as a valuable method of instruction in medical/health education, there can be limitations associated with its use. Proper implementation and evaluation are integral component of effective evidence-based nursing education, which ultimately leads to safe and competent bedside care. Successful implementation of simulation is not guaranteed by the purchase and installation of sophisticated equipment alone. Without adequate preparation, simulation could be counterproductive, creating an unorganized and unrealistic learning environment that is not valued by students. To avoid a fiscal fiasco, colleges of nursing are encouraged to follow a relevant and valid instructional design plan through all phases of the HS educational experience. Additionally, nursing education research implications are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvidence-Based Nursing Education: Effective Use of Instructional Design and Human Simulation to Enhance Knowledge Transfer in Undergraduate Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150927-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evidence-Based Nursing Education: Effective Use of Instructional Design and Human Simulation to Enhance Knowledge Transfer in Undergraduate Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Robinson, Bridget K., PhD, MSN, RN, RRT</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Alabama</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bkrobinson@usouthal.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] As a profession, nursing is considered as both an art and a science based discipline. The art of nursing which is often likened to a ?gut feeling? or ?intuition? is an abstract concept that is not easily quantified and near impossible to teach. Although abstract, intuition is cited as the integral factor in preventing critical patient events. It is known the nursing intuition is enhanced with experience. Experience has been recognized as a key component to transforming the novice nurse to expert status. However, there are times when clinical instructors must forgo valuable teachable moments to ensure patient safety. Additionally, curriculum requirements and student/instructor ratios often interfere with the undergraduate nursing students? opportunity for exposure to the patient setting prior to graduating. The simulated clinical setting presents a useful teaching strategy that overcomes these educational barriers. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight the evidence that supports the use of a user-centered instructional design towards incorporating human simulation into undergraduate nursing education. An educational strategy that enhances knowledge transfer, facilitates competence, and promotes safe practice among undergraduate nursing students. <br/>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Although human simulation has been established as a valuable method of instruction in medical/health education, there can be limitations associated with its use. Proper implementation and evaluation are integral component of effective evidence-based nursing education, which ultimately leads to safe and competent bedside care. Successful implementation of simulation is not guaranteed by the purchase and installation of sophisticated equipment alone. Without adequate preparation, simulation could be counterproductive, creating an unorganized and unrealistic learning environment that is not valued by students. To avoid a fiscal fiasco, colleges of nursing are encouraged to follow a relevant and valid instructional design plan through all phases of the HS educational experience. Additionally, nursing education research implications are discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:46:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:46:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.