Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) Palliative Care by Critical Care Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150933
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) Palliative Care by Critical Care Nurses
Abstract:
Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) Palliative Care by Critical Care Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Smith, Jami A., DHEd, RN
P.I. Institution Name:West Texas A&M University
Title:Assistant Professor
[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Palliative care is important in Human Immunodeficiency Virus/ Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) care, both at the end-of-life and throughout the course of illness. Palliative care interventions remain important in the routine care of patients with HIV/AIDS across the continuum of care, not only in order to improve quality of life and address the wide range of medical and psychosocial issues related to chronic, progressive illness, but also in order to help enhance adherence with HIV-specific therapies. Despite all nurses being involved in the delivery of care to dying people although to a greater or lesser degree, there remains marked variability of knowledge and skill surrounding both the care provided and outcomes achieved. Palliative care skills should be incorporated in training for all clinical staff, and palliative care domains addressed in standard assessment procedures. Critical care nurses must be able to use critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and communicate effectively with multidisciplinary team members. They must also possess key critical care skills and competencies that will equip them when faced with a patient with critical care needs and must be competent in palliative care. In order to determine the competence of critical care nurses to deliver the level of care expected of specialists, nursing requires a clear description of the attributes and standards expected of nurses. It is imperative that each critical care nurse is assessed and evaluated on his/her knowledge of palliative care, exposure to critical care, and ability to care and provide palliative care. Palliative care research needs to be enhanced and access to palliative care expertise needs to be improved. Therefore, a HIV/AIDS palliative care course is designed, implemented, and evaluated to prepare nurses to assume the role of a critical care nurse in the healthcare setting.

Palliative care is important in Human Immunodeficiency Virus/ Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) care, both at the end-of-life and throughout the course of illness. Palliative care interventions remain important in the routine care of patients with HIV/AIDS across the continuum of care, not only in order to improve quality of life and address the wide range of medical and psychosocial issues related to chronic, progressive illness, but also in order to help enhance adherence with HIV-specific therapies. Despite all nurses being involved in the delivery of care to dying people although to a greater or lesser degree, there remains marked variability of knowledge and skill surrounding both the care provided and outcomes achieved. Palliative care skills should be incorporated in training for all clinical staff, and palliative care domains addressed in standard assessment procedures. Critical care nurses must be able to use critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and communicate effectively with multidisciplinary team members. They must also possess key critical care skills and competencies that will equip them when faced with a patient with critical care needs and must be competent in palliative care. In order to determine the competence of critical care nurses to deliver the level of care expected of specialists, nursing requires a clear description of the attributes and standards expected of nurses. It is imperative that each critical care nurse is assessed and evaluated on his/her knowledge of palliative care, exposure to critical care, and ability to care and provide palliative care. Palliative care research needs to be enhanced and access to palliative care expertise needs to be improved. Therefore, a HIV/AIDS palliative care course is designed, implemented, and evaluated to prepare nurses to assume the role of a critical care nurse in the healthcare setting.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHuman Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) Palliative Care by Critical Care Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150933-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) Palliative Care by Critical Care Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, Jami A., DHEd, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">West Texas A&amp;M University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jsmith@wtamu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Palliative care is important in Human Immunodeficiency Virus/ Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) care, both at the end-of-life and throughout the course of illness. Palliative care interventions remain important in the routine care of patients with HIV/AIDS across the continuum of care, not only in order to improve quality of life and address the wide range of medical and psychosocial issues related to chronic, progressive illness, but also in order to help enhance adherence with HIV-specific therapies. Despite all nurses being involved in the delivery of care to dying people although to a greater or lesser degree, there remains marked variability of knowledge and skill surrounding both the care provided and outcomes achieved. Palliative care skills should be incorporated in training for all clinical staff, and palliative care domains addressed in standard assessment procedures. Critical care nurses must be able to use critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and communicate effectively with multidisciplinary team members. They must also possess key critical care skills and competencies that will equip them when faced with a patient with critical care needs and must be competent in palliative care. In order to determine the competence of critical care nurses to deliver the level of care expected of specialists, nursing requires a clear description of the attributes and standards expected of nurses. It is imperative that each critical care nurse is assessed and evaluated on his/her knowledge of palliative care, exposure to critical care, and ability to care and provide palliative care. Palliative care research needs to be enhanced and access to palliative care expertise needs to be improved. Therefore, a HIV/AIDS palliative care course is designed, implemented, and evaluated to prepare nurses to assume the role of a critical care nurse in the healthcare setting. <br/><br/>Palliative care is important in Human Immunodeficiency Virus/ Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) care, both at the end-of-life and throughout the course of illness. Palliative care interventions remain important in the routine care of patients with HIV/AIDS across the continuum of care, not only in order to improve quality of life and address the wide range of medical and psychosocial issues related to chronic, progressive illness, but also in order to help enhance adherence with HIV-specific therapies. Despite all nurses being involved in the delivery of care to dying people although to a greater or lesser degree, there remains marked variability of knowledge and skill surrounding both the care provided and outcomes achieved. Palliative care skills should be incorporated in training for all clinical staff, and palliative care domains addressed in standard assessment procedures. Critical care nurses must be able to use critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and communicate effectively with multidisciplinary team members. They must also possess key critical care skills and competencies that will equip them when faced with a patient with critical care needs and must be competent in palliative care. In order to determine the competence of critical care nurses to deliver the level of care expected of specialists, nursing requires a clear description of the attributes and standards expected of nurses. It is imperative that each critical care nurse is assessed and evaluated on his/her knowledge of palliative care, exposure to critical care, and ability to care and provide palliative care. Palliative care research needs to be enhanced and access to palliative care expertise needs to be improved. Therefore, a HIV/AIDS palliative care course is designed, implemented, and evaluated to prepare nurses to assume the role of a critical care nurse in the healthcare setting.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:47:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:47:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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