Endometritis, chorioamnionitis, neonatal sepsis as complications of bathing after rupture of membranes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150960
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Endometritis, chorioamnionitis, neonatal sepsis as complications of bathing after rupture of membranes
Abstract:
Endometritis, chorioamnionitis, neonatal sepsis as complications of bathing after rupture of membranes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Ross, Margaret, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Ottawa, School of Nursing Sciences
Title:Professor
The fetal membranes are the last physical barrier to infection for

the fetus. Because of concern about possible infection, bathing

after the membranes have ruptured is a commonly prohibited

activity. Although some authors claim that water does not enter

the vagina during a bath (Bobak et al., 1989), there is no evidence

from research evaluating the presence of bath water in the vagina

or the incidence of maternal or neonatal infection after bathing

with ruptured of membranes. With the increased availability of

tubs for bathing in birth centers and increased consumer demand to

utilize them, the question of allowing women to bathe after rupture

of membranes is more frequently being addressed.



The purpose of this study was to examine differences in the

incidence of infection in the neonate, chorioamnionitis in labor,

or maternal endometritis after delivery in women who bathed during

labor with and without ruptured membranes.



Null Hypothesis: There is no difference in the incidence

of neonatal infection, chorioamnionitis, or endometritis

among two groups who bathe in labor: women with intact

membranes and women who have ruptured membranes at the

time of the bath.



The charts of all deliveries (1460) which occurred in 1989 at

Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle were examined. Deliveries were

excluded for: incomplete records, scheduled cesareans, deliveries

in route, or intrauterine fetal demises, leaving 1337 patients who

labored. More than half, 732 (54.7 percent), used the tubs. Of

those 376, (51.4 percent), had rupture of membranes prior to using

the tubs. There was no difference in the rates of infection

between those who used the tub and those who did not. The

incidence of chorioamnionitis was 8 in women who used the tub after

the membranes ruptured and 10 in those who bathed with intact

membranes. The incidence of postpartum endometritis was 8 in both

groups. The incidence of neonatal sepsis was 2 after bathing after

rupture of membranes and O in those with intact membranes. There

was no statistical difference in the rate of any of these

infections between the two groups. The results of this study do

not support restriction of bathing during labor or after rupture of

membranes due to concern about infection risk.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEndometritis, chorioamnionitis, neonatal sepsis as complications of bathing after rupture of membranesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150960-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Endometritis, chorioamnionitis, neonatal sepsis as complications of bathing after rupture of membranes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ross, Margaret, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Ottawa, School of Nursing Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mmrna@uottawa.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The fetal membranes are the last physical barrier to infection for<br/><br/>the fetus. Because of concern about possible infection, bathing<br/><br/>after the membranes have ruptured is a commonly prohibited<br/><br/>activity. Although some authors claim that water does not enter<br/><br/>the vagina during a bath (Bobak et al., 1989), there is no evidence<br/><br/>from research evaluating the presence of bath water in the vagina<br/><br/>or the incidence of maternal or neonatal infection after bathing<br/><br/>with ruptured of membranes. With the increased availability of<br/><br/>tubs for bathing in birth centers and increased consumer demand to<br/><br/>utilize them, the question of allowing women to bathe after rupture<br/><br/>of membranes is more frequently being addressed.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The purpose of this study was to examine differences in the<br/><br/>incidence of infection in the neonate, chorioamnionitis in labor,<br/><br/>or maternal endometritis after delivery in women who bathed during<br/><br/>labor with and without ruptured membranes.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Null Hypothesis: There is no difference in the incidence<br/><br/>of neonatal infection, chorioamnionitis, or endometritis<br/><br/>among two groups who bathe in labor: women with intact<br/><br/>membranes and women who have ruptured membranes at the<br/><br/>time of the bath.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The charts of all deliveries (1460) which occurred in 1989 at<br/><br/>Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle were examined. Deliveries were<br/><br/>excluded for: incomplete records, scheduled cesareans, deliveries<br/><br/>in route, or intrauterine fetal demises, leaving 1337 patients who<br/><br/>labored. More than half, 732 (54.7 percent), used the tubs. Of<br/><br/>those 376, (51.4 percent), had rupture of membranes prior to using<br/><br/>the tubs. There was no difference in the rates of infection<br/><br/>between those who used the tub and those who did not. The<br/><br/>incidence of chorioamnionitis was 8 in women who used the tub after<br/><br/>the membranes ruptured and 10 in those who bathed with intact<br/><br/>membranes. The incidence of postpartum endometritis was 8 in both<br/><br/>groups. The incidence of neonatal sepsis was 2 after bathing after<br/><br/>rupture of membranes and O in those with intact membranes. There<br/><br/>was no statistical difference in the rate of any of these<br/><br/>infections between the two groups. The results of this study do<br/><br/>not support restriction of bathing during labor or after rupture of<br/><br/>membranes due to concern about infection risk.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:47:48Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:47:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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