2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150987
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Race-Related Stressors and Preterm Birth in African-American Women
Abstract:
Race-Related Stressors and Preterm Birth in African-American Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Giurgescu, Carmen, PhD, RN, WHNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Barbara Dancy, PhD, MS, BSN; Shannon Zenk, PhD, RN; Laura Szalacha, EdD
[Research Presentation] Purpose: In 2006 in the United States, more than half a million infants were born prematurely (<37 weeks), the leading cause of neonatal mortality and long-term health problems. Compared with white women, African-American (AA) women have almost twice the rate of preterm birth, are more likely to experience racial discrimination and live in impoverished neighborhoods. The purpose of this study was to (1) examine the relationships among adverse neighborhood conditions (poverty, disorder, crime), racial discrimination, personal resources (optimism, self-esteem, social support), and stress responses (distress, anxiety, depression); and (2) explore whether differences exist in these variables between women with preterm birth and women with full term birth. Methods: In a descriptive cross-sectional design, guided by Lazarus and Folkman transactional model of stress and coping, we compared neighborhood conditions, racial discrimination, personal resources and stress responses between women with preterm birth and women with full term birth. Results: Participants (n1=39 full term birth, n2=33 preterm birth) had a mean age of 23 years and a mean gestation of 36.5 weeks at birth. These women tended to be single (82%), employed (53%), and have some college education (39%). Women who reported higher levels of neighborhood crime and disorder also reported higher levels of racial discrimination, distress, anxiety, depression and lower levels of optimism, self-esteem, and social support. Women who reported higher levels of racial discrimination also reported higher levels of distress, anxiety, depression and lower levels of optimism, self-esteem, and social support. Compared with women with full term birth, women with preterm birth had lower levels of self-esteem and higher levels of distress and anxiety. Conclusion: Health care providers need to (1) assess how neighborhood conditions and experiences of racial discrimination influence women's personal resources and stress responses; and (2) implement strategies to enhance women's self-esteem and reduce the distress and anxiety they are experiencing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRace-Related Stressors and Preterm Birth in African-American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150987-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Race-Related Stressors and Preterm Birth in African-American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Giurgescu, Carmen, PhD, RN, WHNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carmeng7@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara Dancy, PhD, MS, BSN; Shannon Zenk, PhD, RN; Laura Szalacha, EdD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose: In 2006 in the United States, more than half a million infants were born prematurely (&lt;37 weeks),&nbsp;the leading cause of neonatal mortality and long-term health problems. Compared with white women, African-American (AA) women have almost twice the rate of preterm birth, are more likely to experience racial discrimination and live in impoverished neighborhoods. The purpose of this study was to (1) examine the relationships among adverse neighborhood conditions (poverty, disorder, crime), racial discrimination, personal resources (optimism, self-esteem, social support), and stress responses (distress, anxiety, depression); and (2) explore whether differences exist in these variables between women with preterm birth and women with full term birth. Methods: In a descriptive cross-sectional design, guided by Lazarus and Folkman transactional model of stress and coping, we compared neighborhood conditions, racial discrimination, personal resources and stress responses between women with preterm birth and women with full term birth. Results: Participants (n1=39 full term birth, n2=33 preterm birth) had a mean age of 23 years and a mean gestation of 36.5 weeks at birth. These women tended to be single (82%), employed (53%), and have some college education (39%). Women who reported higher levels of neighborhood crime and disorder also reported higher levels of racial discrimination, distress, anxiety, depression and lower levels of optimism, self-esteem, and social support. Women who reported higher levels of racial discrimination also reported higher levels of distress, anxiety, depression and lower levels of optimism, self-esteem, and social support. Compared with women with full term birth, women with preterm birth had lower levels of self-esteem and higher levels of distress and anxiety. Conclusion: Health care providers need to (1) assess how neighborhood conditions and experiences of racial discrimination influence women's personal resources and stress responses; and&nbsp;(2) implement&nbsp;strategies to enhance women's self-esteem and reduce the distress and anxiety they are experiencing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:48:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:48:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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