The Relationship between Cognitive Beliefs and Healthy Lifestyle Choices and Behaviors in Teens

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151009
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship between Cognitive Beliefs and Healthy Lifestyle Choices and Behaviors in Teens
Abstract:
The Relationship between Cognitive Beliefs and Healthy Lifestyle Choices and Behaviors in Teens
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:O'Haver, Judith, PhD, RN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN; Diana L. Jacobson, MS, RN, CPNP; Stephanie A. Kelly, MS, FNP-C
[Research Symposium Presentation] Purpose: The basic premise of cognitive behavioral theory (CBT) is that an individual?s emotions and behaviors are in large part determined by his or her beliefs and the way in which he or she cognitively appraises the world. The theory would predict that adolescents who believe in their ability to engage in healthy lifestyle choices and behaviors would make healthier lifestyle choices and engage in healthier lifestyle behaviors than teens that have weaker cognitive beliefs about their ability to do so. Cognitive behavior theory also would predict that stronger cognitive beliefs would be related to less anxiety and depressive symptoms. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the findings from a series of studies that have supported these relationships with culturally diverse adolescents. Methods: Four descriptive correlational pilot studies were conducted on convenience samples of culturally diverse adolescents, ranging in age from 14 to 19 years.  Key variables measured included healthy lifestyle beliefs, healthy lifestyle choices and behaviors, anxiety and depression.  Results: Teens with stronger cognitive beliefs about their ability to engage in a healthy lifestyle have reported healthier lifestyle choices as well as healthier lifestyle behaviors. These studies also have demonstrated that higher levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms in teens are related to weaker cognitive beliefs about the ability to lead a healthy lifestyle. Conclusion: Findings from this body of evidence support cognitive behavioral theory, in that how adolescents think are directly related to how they feel and how they behave. Therefore, interventions such as the COPE TEEN program that are guided by CBT and incorporate cognitive-behavioral skills building activities may be especially useful in promoting healthy lifestyle choices and behaviors in adolescents.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship between Cognitive Beliefs and Healthy Lifestyle Choices and Behaviors in Teensen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151009-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship between Cognitive Beliefs and Healthy Lifestyle Choices and Behaviors in Teens</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">O'Haver, Judith, PhD, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">judith.ohaver@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN; Diana L. Jacobson, MS, RN, CPNP; Stephanie A. Kelly, MS, FNP-C</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Symposium Presentation] Purpose: The basic premise of cognitive behavioral theory (CBT) is that an individual?s emotions and behaviors are in large part determined by his or her beliefs and the way in which he or she cognitively appraises the world. The theory would predict that adolescents&nbsp;who believe in their ability to engage in healthy lifestyle choices and behaviors would make healthier lifestyle choices and engage in healthier lifestyle behaviors than teens that have weaker cognitive beliefs about their ability to do so. Cognitive behavior theory also would predict that stronger cognitive beliefs would be related to less anxiety and depressive symptoms. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the findings from a series of studies that have supported these relationships with culturally diverse adolescents. Methods: Four descriptive correlational pilot studies were conducted on convenience samples of culturally diverse adolescents, ranging in age from 14 to 19 years.&nbsp; Key variables measured included healthy lifestyle beliefs, healthy lifestyle choices and&nbsp;behaviors, anxiety and depression.&nbsp; Results: Teens with stronger cognitive beliefs about their ability to engage in a healthy lifestyle have reported healthier lifestyle choices as well as healthier lifestyle behaviors. These studies also have demonstrated that higher levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms in teens are related to weaker cognitive beliefs about the ability to lead a healthy lifestyle. Conclusion: Findings from this body of evidence support cognitive behavioral theory, in that how adolescents think are directly related to how they feel and how they behave. Therefore, interventions such as the COPE TEEN program that are guided by CBT and incorporate cognitive-behavioral skills building activities may be especially useful in promoting healthy lifestyle choices and behaviors in adolescents.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:49:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:49:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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