Willingness for Foot Care, Psychological State, and State of Foot Lesions in Diabetic Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151010
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Willingness for Foot Care, Psychological State, and State of Foot Lesions in Diabetic Patients
Abstract:
Willingness for Foot Care, Psychological State, and State of Foot Lesions in Diabetic Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Onbe, Hiromi, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Gunma University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Michiyo Oka, RN, PhD; Etuko Maezawa, RN; Miki Yamamoto, RN; Eri Ibe, RN; Satsuki Takahashi, RN
[Research Presentation] Purpose: The relationships among willingness for foot care, psychological state, and state of foot lesions in diabetic patients were evaluated. Methods: A questionnaire survey (basic attributes, willingness, self-efficacy, social support, etc.) and examination of the state of the feet using an assessment sheet (presence or absence of foot lesions, palpation of arteries, etc.) were performed in outpatients with diabetes mellitusl. Results: Valid answers were obtained from 278 patients, consisting of 158 males (56.8%) and 120 females (43.2%) with a mean age of 64.46 +/- 11.5 years. Willingness for foot care was high in the maintenance period, with 107 patients (38.1%) being willing to receive it. Of the patients in the maintenance period, 82 (84%) had foot lesions such as callosity, clavi, and ringworm either alone or in combination, and only 17 (16%) were without foot lesions. The self-efficacy score was 18.78, and social support score was 14.07. Conclusion: Willingness for foot care was highest in the maintenance period, but as the risk level was most often 2, patients in the maintenance period are considered likely to develop foot lesions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWillingness for Foot Care, Psychological State, and State of Foot Lesions in Diabetic Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151010-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Willingness for Foot Care, Psychological State, and State of Foot Lesions in Diabetic Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Onbe, Hiromi, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Gunma University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sanaki@health.gunma-u.ac.jp</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michiyo Oka, RN, PhD; Etuko Maezawa, RN; Miki Yamamoto, RN; Eri Ibe, RN; Satsuki Takahashi, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose: The relationships among willingness for foot care, psychological state, and state of foot lesions in diabetic patients were evaluated. Methods: A questionnaire survey (basic attributes, willingness, self-efficacy, social support, etc.) and examination of the state of the feet using an assessment sheet (presence or absence of foot lesions, palpation of arteries, etc.) were performed in outpatients with diabetes mellitusl. Results: Valid answers were obtained from 278 patients, consisting of 158 males (56.8%) and 120 females (43.2%) with a mean age of 64.46 +/- 11.5 years. Willingness for foot care was high in the maintenance period, with 107 patients (38.1%) being willing to receive it. Of the patients in the maintenance period, 82 (84%) had foot lesions such as callosity, clavi, and ringworm either alone or in combination, and only 17 (16%) were without foot lesions. The self-efficacy score was 18.78, and social support score was 14.07. Conclusion: Willingness for foot care was highest in the maintenance period, but as the risk level was most often 2, patients in the maintenance period are considered likely to develop foot lesions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:49:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:49:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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