Using GIS to Explore Gender Disparity in Accessing Mental Health Services in Urban Communities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151044
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using GIS to Explore Gender Disparity in Accessing Mental Health Services in Urban Communities
Abstract:
Using GIS to Explore Gender Disparity in Accessing Mental Health Services in Urban Communities
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Chen, Huey J., PhD, APRN-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Georgia State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Grace Choate,
21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: The purpose of this study is to exam whether adult females are more likely to have difficulty in accessing psychiatric care in terms of availability of mental health providers in the two urban communities, Dekalb and Fulton counties in metro Atlanta Area. Methods: This study used multiple data sources: (1) the 2000 U.S. Census data to identify subjects with mental disabilities as a proxy for needing mental health services; and (2) mental health provider information obtained from state licensing agencies to identified active licensed mental health care providers, including psychiatrist, advanced practice psychiatric mental health registered nurses, licensed psychologist, licensed social workers, licensed mental health counselors and licensed family therapists, within the target areas.ÿIndividuals with mental health needs of both genders as well area social economic status were identified in each census tract. The prevalence rates of mental disability for each gender were calculated and compared. Zip codes of eligible mental health providers were geocoded into census tracts within the target area to create a visual presentation of distribution comparisons between individuals needed mental health services in relation to the geographical distribution of providers. Results: In Fulton County, both males and females with a mental disability are more likely to be in the areas where they have less mental health care providers while females with a mental disability tend to be in the areas where they have less mental health care providers within Dekalb County. Conclusion: There is an indication of greater difficulty in accessing mental health services by people with a mental disability, especiallyÿamong the female population in Dekalb County. An increase of availability of mental healthcare providers in the target area is needed. Interventions to increase provider availability should take into consideration of the geographic differences to meet the local community needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing GIS to Explore Gender Disparity in Accessing Mental Health Services in Urban Communitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151044-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using GIS to Explore Gender Disparity in Accessing Mental Health Services in Urban Communities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chen, Huey J., PhD, APRN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Georgia State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hchen17@gsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Grace Choate,</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: The purpose of this study is to exam whether adult females are more likely to have difficulty in accessing psychiatric care in terms of availability of mental health providers in the two urban communities, Dekalb and Fulton counties in metro Atlanta Area. Methods: This study used multiple data sources: (1) the 2000 U.S. Census data to identify subjects with mental disabilities as a proxy for needing mental health services; and (2) mental health provider information obtained from state licensing agencies to identified active licensed mental health care providers, including psychiatrist, advanced practice psychiatric mental health registered nurses, licensed psychologist, licensed social workers, licensed mental health counselors and licensed family therapists, within the target areas.&yuml;Individuals with mental health needs of both genders as well area social economic status were identified in each census tract. The prevalence rates of mental disability for each gender were calculated and compared. Zip codes of eligible mental health providers were geocoded into census tracts within the target area to create a visual presentation of distribution comparisons between individuals needed mental health services in relation to the geographical distribution of providers. Results: In Fulton County, both males and females with a mental disability are more likely to be in the areas where they have less mental health care providers while females with a mental disability tend to be in the areas where they have less mental health care providers within Dekalb County. Conclusion: There is an indication of greater difficulty in accessing mental health services by people with a mental disability, especially&yuml;among the female population in Dekalb County. An increase of availability of mental healthcare providers in the target area is needed. Interventions to increase provider availability should take into consideration of the geographic differences to meet the local community needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:50:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:50:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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