Giving Voice to Patients on Ventilators: Perceptions of the Restraint Experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151058
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Giving Voice to Patients on Ventilators: Perceptions of the Restraint Experience
Abstract:
Giving Voice to Patients on Ventilators: Perceptions of the Restraint Experience
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Dodd, Sandra S., MSN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Martin Memorial Medical Center
Title:Nursing Supervisor
Co-Authors:Suzanne J. Crouch, EdD, MSN, ARNP, RN-BC
21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: Patients who are on ventilators and physical restraints often have little or no "voice" to express their physical, emotional, or spiritual concerns. Even though the use of physical restraints is a standard of practice, physical restraints have been shown to cause psychological, physical, legal, and ethical problems (Mott, Poole. & Kenrick, 2005). While there is significant published work on restraints in regards to safety, ethical, and family concerns, there is little nursing research on patients' perceptions of the physical restraint experience (Happ, Tuite, Dobbin, Di-Virgilio-Thomas, & Kitutu, 2004). The purpose of this nursing research study was to view restraint experiences through the lens of patients' eyes and listen to their voices regarding their experiences. Methods: Fifty patients who had been admitted to one of four Intensive Care Units at two medical centers in southeastern Florida participated in the study. After the patient was weaned from the ventilator and removed from restraints, the nurse researcher contacted the patient to conduct an interview with the intent of listening to the patients' perceptions of the restraint experience. Results: Qualitative analysis revealed recurring themes of anxiety and helplessness related to loss of autonomy. "I felt bad. I felt like an animal tied down." "Frightened, I was unable to complete my prayer with making the sign of the cross."ÿ"Even though my arms were exercised periodically by the nurse, I could not move them very well for days after I was released." "I felt like I was drowning from reflux." Conclusion: The information gathered may shed new light on patients' anxieties and perceptions of the ventilator and restraint experience. Additionally, findings may aid healthcare workers in actively listening to patients' voices. Implications for nursing practice may include an improvement in patient autonomy and an enhancement in overall quality of care and patient satisfaction.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGiving Voice to Patients on Ventilators: Perceptions of the Restraint Experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151058-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Giving Voice to Patients on Ventilators: Perceptions of the Restraint Experience</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dodd, Sandra S., MSN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Martin Memorial Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing Supervisor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sasjack@comcast.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Suzanne J. Crouch, EdD, MSN, ARNP, RN-BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: Patients who are on ventilators and physical restraints often have little or no &quot;voice&quot; to express their physical, emotional, or spiritual concerns. Even though the use of physical restraints is a standard of practice, physical restraints have been shown to cause psychological, physical, legal, and ethical problems (Mott, Poole. &amp; Kenrick, 2005). While there is significant published work on restraints in regards to safety, ethical, and family concerns, there is little nursing research on patients' perceptions of the physical restraint experience (Happ, Tuite, Dobbin, Di-Virgilio-Thomas, &amp; Kitutu, 2004). The purpose of this nursing research study was to view restraint experiences through the lens of patients' eyes and listen to their voices regarding their experiences. Methods: Fifty patients who had been admitted to one of four Intensive Care Units at two medical centers in southeastern Florida participated in the study. After the patient was weaned from the ventilator and removed from restraints, the nurse researcher contacted the patient to conduct an interview with the intent of listening to the patients' perceptions of the restraint experience. Results: Qualitative analysis revealed recurring themes of anxiety and helplessness related to loss of autonomy. &quot;I felt bad. I felt like an animal tied down.&quot; &quot;Frightened, I was unable to complete my prayer with making the sign of the cross.&quot;&yuml;&quot;Even though my arms were exercised periodically by the nurse, I could not move them very well for days after I was released.&quot; &quot;I felt like I was drowning from reflux.&quot; Conclusion: The information gathered may shed new light on patients' anxieties and perceptions of the ventilator and restraint experience. Additionally, findings may aid healthcare workers in actively listening to patients' voices. Implications for nursing practice may include an improvement in patient autonomy and an enhancement in overall quality of care and patient satisfaction.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:50:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:50:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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