2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151129
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Taiwanese Elders' Residential Decisions: A Grounded Theory Study
Abstract:
Taiwanese Elders' Residential Decisions: A Grounded Theory Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Chen, Shu-Li, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Tennessee
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Janet W. Brown, PhD, RN; Linda C. Mefford, PhD, RN; Shu-Hui Yeh, PhD, RN
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] With the increasing population of those 65 and older, there is a great need globally for research guidance to help elders and their family members in deciding which residential alternative is the most appropriate one. However, literature is lacking about how elders choose one form of residential option over another. The purposes of this grounded theory study were to: (1) explore circumstances impacting Taiwanese elders' residential decisions, and (2) explore the process, experiences, perspectives, thoughts, and feelings of elders making residential decisions. A purposive sample of 42 participants were interviewed, including nursing home residents, assisted living residents, community-dwelling elders, elders' family members, healthcare providers, and community leaders. The story of Taiwanese elders' living arrangements is a story about learning, deciding, changing, and adapting. Deciding where to reside in later life was precipitated by learning abilities. A large number of hindering and facilitating factors affecting elders' learning abilities were identified and included: attitudes, values, beliefs, knowledge, family support system, societal support system, environmental factors, and many others. Changes occurred whenever elders made a residential decision. Elders' began to adapt to changes through action/interaction strategies collectively named "Live and Learn." The complexity of such adaptation process is another significant research finding. Examples of strategies include: "I planed my retirement since I was at my 20's," "I took care of my children when they were young; so they would take care of me when I am old," ôEverything will be fine. I live one day at a time,ö and "Dying is better than living to be a burden of others." Results of this study provide a theoretical framework for health care providers to assist elders and their significant others in making living arrangements for later life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTaiwanese Elders' Residential Decisions: A Grounded Theory Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151129-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Taiwanese Elders' Residential Decisions: A Grounded Theory Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chen, Shu-Li, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Tennessee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">schen4@utk.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Janet W. Brown, PhD, RN; Linda C. Mefford, PhD, RN; Shu-Hui Yeh, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] With the increasing population of those 65 and older, there is a great need globally for research guidance to help elders and their family members in deciding which residential alternative is the most appropriate one. However, literature is lacking about how elders choose one form of residential option over another. The purposes of this grounded theory study were to: (1) explore circumstances impacting Taiwanese elders' residential decisions, and (2) explore the process, experiences, perspectives, thoughts, and feelings of elders making residential decisions. A purposive sample of 42 participants were interviewed, including nursing home residents, assisted living residents, community-dwelling elders, elders' family members, healthcare providers, and community leaders. The story of Taiwanese elders' living arrangements is a story about learning, deciding, changing, and adapting. Deciding where to reside in later life was precipitated by learning abilities. A large number of hindering and facilitating factors affecting elders' learning abilities were identified and included: attitudes, values, beliefs, knowledge, family support system, societal support system, environmental factors, and many others. Changes occurred whenever elders made a residential decision. Elders' began to adapt to changes through action/interaction strategies collectively named &quot;Live and Learn.&quot; The complexity of such adaptation process is another significant research finding. Examples of strategies include: &quot;I planed my retirement since I was at my 20's,&quot; &quot;I took care of my children when they were young; so they would take care of me when I am old,&quot; &ocirc;Everything will be fine. I live one day at a time,&ouml; and &quot;Dying is better than living to be a burden of others.&quot; Results of this study provide a theoretical framework for health care providers to assist elders and their significant others in making living arrangements for later life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:52:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:52:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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