2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151160
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Academia...Oh No!: Reasons Registered Nurses Do Not Choose Academia
Abstract:
Academia...Oh No!: Reasons Registered Nurses Do Not Choose Academia
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Lawrence, Wanda, PhD, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Winston-Salem State University
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] A shortage of registered nurses has become a global issue for health care administrators and legislators, who are endeavoring to determine strategies to improve the nursing shortage. The National League for Nursing (NLN) indicates that nurse educators are the important factor needed to prepare enough registered nurses necessary to provide quality care to the American population. The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) predict a need for one million more nurses by 2020 to meet the demands of the projected population (Habel, 2006). Consequently, the nursing profession must have an adequate number of nurse faculty to prepare the next generation of nurses. Faculty shortages at nursing schools across the country are limiting student capacity at a time when the need for nurses continues to grow. According to AACN's report on (2003-2004) Enrollment and Graduations in Baccalaureate and Graduate Programs in Nursing, U.S. nursing schools turned away 15,944 qualified applicants to entry-level baccalaureate nursing programs due in part to insufficient number of faculty. This presentation will describe research using a qualitative research design that investigated reasons registered nurses in one state who have the academic credentials to teach nursing decide not to. The study sought further to determine if the role and expectations of nurse faculty influence the nurses' decision. A purposeful sampling technique was used to choose 12 focus groups of registered nurses invited to participate using a systematic selection process. A content analysis approach was used for analyzing the data. Results of this study identify changes that need to occur in order to entice registered nurses to teach in academia. Thus, this study has significance for leaders in higher education, nurse leaders and legislators. The presenter will discuss how recommendations if implemented can entice qualified nurses to teach in academia. Recommendations from this study can be implemented globally.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAcademia...Oh No!: Reasons Registered Nurses Do Not Choose Academiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151160-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Academia...Oh No!: Reasons Registered Nurses Do Not Choose Academia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lawrence, Wanda, PhD, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Winston-Salem State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lawrencew@wssu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] A shortage of registered nurses has become a global issue for health care administrators and legislators, who are endeavoring to determine strategies to improve the nursing shortage. The National League for Nursing (NLN) indicates that nurse educators are the important factor needed to prepare enough registered nurses necessary to provide quality care to the American population. The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) predict a need for one million more nurses by 2020 to meet the demands of the projected population (Habel, 2006). Consequently, the nursing profession must have an adequate number of nurse faculty to prepare the next generation of nurses. Faculty shortages at nursing schools across the country are limiting student capacity at a time when the need for nurses continues to grow. According to AACN's report on (2003-2004) Enrollment and Graduations in Baccalaureate and Graduate Programs in Nursing, U.S. nursing schools turned away 15,944 qualified applicants to entry-level baccalaureate nursing programs due in part to insufficient number of faculty. This presentation will describe research using a qualitative research design that investigated reasons registered nurses in one state who have the academic credentials to teach nursing decide not to. The study sought further to determine if the role and expectations of nurse faculty influence the nurses' decision. A purposeful sampling technique was used to choose 12 focus groups of registered nurses invited to participate using a systematic selection process. A content analysis approach was used for analyzing the data. Results of this study identify changes that need to occur in order to entice registered nurses to teach in academia. Thus, this study has significance for leaders in higher education, nurse leaders and legislators. The presenter will discuss how recommendations if implemented can entice qualified nurses to teach in academia. Recommendations from this study can be implemented globally.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:53:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:53:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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