2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151207
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses Knowledge of Postpartum Affective Disorders
Abstract:
Nurses Knowledge of Postpartum Affective Disorders
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Ugarriza, Doris, ARNP, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Miami School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] The incidence of postpartum depression is increasing and health-care providers are not referring women with the illness for treatment. Non-referral is due to two main reasons. The first is the lack of knowledge on the part of health-care providers about postpartum depression and its signs and symptoms. The second is the failure of health-care providers to properly screen for the condition. The purpose of this study was to assess the degree to which nurse working in primary care facilities understand the signs, symptoms, and growing incidence of postpartum depression. Using a questionnaire specifically designed for this study, 100 nurse practitioners in the greater Miami-Dade area were tested for the degree of knowledge they have about postpartum depression and how to screen for it. The results of this pilot study indicate that nurses are unaware of the distinction among postpartum blues, psychosis, and depression, lumping all three under the rubric of postpartum depression. Nurses also have limited knowledge of the treatments available to mothers suffering from postpartum depression and were unaware of the barriers that new mothers encounter in asking and receiving help. The degree to which stigma, breastfeeding, and social pressure affect treatment choices on the part of mothers and health care providers was found to be under-appreciated. The situation is so grave that many US States have or are considering legislation mandating that health care providers notify all pregnant women that they run a 10% chance of developing a postpartum depressive disorder. Implications for practice include the suggestion that graduate programs in Nursing contain content of postpartum affective disorders, their identification, severity, and treatment and that practitioners be encouraged to continue education on developments in this area.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses Knowledge of Postpartum Affective Disordersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151207-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses Knowledge of Postpartum Affective Disorders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ugarriza, Doris, ARNP, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Miami School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dugarriza@miami.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] The incidence of postpartum depression is increasing and health-care providers are not referring women with the illness for treatment. Non-referral is due to two main reasons. The first is the lack of knowledge on the part of health-care providers about postpartum depression and its signs and symptoms. The second is the failure of health-care providers to properly screen for the condition. The purpose of this study was to assess the degree to which nurse working in primary care facilities understand the signs, symptoms, and growing incidence of postpartum depression. Using a questionnaire specifically designed for this study, 100 nurse practitioners in the greater Miami-Dade area were tested for the degree of knowledge they have about postpartum depression and how to screen for it. The results of this pilot study indicate that nurses are unaware of the distinction among postpartum blues, psychosis, and depression, lumping all three under the rubric of postpartum depression. Nurses also have limited knowledge of the treatments available to mothers suffering from postpartum depression and were unaware of the barriers that new mothers encounter in asking and receiving help. The degree to which stigma, breastfeeding, and social pressure affect treatment choices on the part of mothers and health care providers was found to be under-appreciated. The situation is so grave that many US States have or are considering legislation mandating that health care providers notify all pregnant women that they run a 10% chance of developing a postpartum depressive disorder. Implications for practice include the suggestion that graduate programs in Nursing contain content of postpartum affective disorders, their identification, severity, and treatment and that practitioners be encouraged to continue education on developments in this area.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:55:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:55:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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