Determination of Elective Surgical Patients' Awareness of the "Speak Up" Initiative by Joint Commission

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151221
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determination of Elective Surgical Patients' Awareness of the "Speak Up" Initiative by Joint Commission
Abstract:
Determination of Elective Surgical Patients' Awareness of the "Speak Up" Initiative by Joint Commission
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Asher, Mary Elizabeth, MSN, RN, CS, CPAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Miami
Title:Clinical Instructor
[Evidence-based Practice Session Presentation] Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine if elective surgical patients undergoing joint replacements (knee or hip) have been informed about the "Speak Up" initiative developed by the Joint Commission to prevent medical health care errors during hospitalization. Background: Keeping patients safe during hospitalization is a priority for nurses. The "Speak Up" initiative was developed by Joint Commission in 2003 to promote patient safety during hospitalization and to decrease the number of medical health care errors by promoting patient awareness and participation. A total of 10 "Speak Up" brochures have been developed by the Joint Commission and are available on line for health care providers. More than 600 accredited organizations in 2005 were surveyed by the Joint Commission regarding the Speak Up campaign. Sixty five percent of the organizations surveyed reprinted information listed in the Speak Up brochures in the handbooks distributed to patients/residents/clients. Methods: This descriptive pilot study will determine patient awareness of the "Speak Up" initiative and their "right to know "in preventing medical errors within the health care setting.  The study will be conducted over a 12 month period.  The "Speak Up Initiative Survey" (SUIS) is a 40-item questionnaire measuring patient?s awareness of specific Joint Commission recommended "Speak Up" initiatives designed to empower health consumers in prevention of medical errors while hospitalized.  A five-point Likert scale  is used to determine patient awareness of key initiatives with higher total scores indicating more exposure.  The target sample population (N=100) is consenting adults who have undergone elective knee/hip replacement surgery. Discussion:   Since March 2003 the Joint Commission [Research Presentation] Purpose: The aims of this presentation are to clarify the concept of physiological birth and to compare it to the related concepts of natural birth and normal birth. Methods: Concept analysis was conducted using the Walker & Avant (2005) method. Results: Twelve defining attributes of physiological birth are identified.  They are: (a) the onset of labor is spontaneous (b) labor is not augmented but proceeds spontaneously (c) no intravenous fluids are administered (d) the labor and delivery are unmedicated (no epidural) (e) no routine interventions are used (f) there is no artificial rupture of membranes (g) the laboring woman has freedom of movement (h) she uses advantageous (non-supine) pushing positions (i) episiotomy is not performed (j) the birth occurs vaginally (k) the placenta is delivered without the use of oxytocics (l) and the result of the delivery is a live newborn.  A model case, alternative cases, antecedents, consequences, and empirical referents of physiological birth are all described. Neither 'natural birth' nor 'normal birth' are ideal terms for use in research or in practice.  'Natural birth' is a value-laden term with imprecise boundaries.  'Normal birth' is conceptually unstable because its meaning is unclear and context-specific.  'Physiological birth' is the appropriate term to fill a critical void in the lexicon of birth care. Conclusion: In research and in practice, productive discourse about birth requires commonly accepted conceptual referents.  Both 'natural birth' and 'normal birth' are inadequate in this regard.  By contrast, 'physiological birth' is conceptually clear, stable, and value-neutral.  Because its defining attributes are derived from the physiological processes of birth, and not by care practices, 'physiological birth' can be used and understood within and across cultural contexts. Reference: Walker, L. O. & Avant, K. C. (2005). Strategies for theory construction in nursing (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson/Prentice Hall. "Speak Up" Initiative has focused on patients actively participating in the prevention of health care errors by becoming "active, involved and informed participants".  Awareness of both HCWs and patients to this initiative will help prevent medical errors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDetermination of Elective Surgical Patients' Awareness of the "Speak Up" Initiative by Joint Commissionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151221-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Determination of Elective Surgical Patients' Awareness of the &quot;Speak Up&quot; Initiative by Joint Commission</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Asher, Mary Elizabeth, MSN, RN, CS, CPAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Miami</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">masher@miami.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Practice Session Presentation] Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine if elective surgical patients undergoing joint replacements (knee or hip) have been informed about the &quot;Speak Up&quot; initiative developed by the Joint Commission to prevent medical health care errors during hospitalization. Background: Keeping patients safe during hospitalization is a priority for nurses. The &quot;Speak Up&quot; initiative was developed by Joint Commission in 2003 to promote patient safety during hospitalization and to decrease the number of medical health care errors by promoting patient awareness and participation. A total of 10 &quot;Speak Up&quot; brochures have been developed by the Joint Commission and are available on line for health care providers. More than 600 accredited organizations in 2005 were surveyed by the Joint Commission regarding the Speak Up campaign. Sixty five percent of the organizations surveyed reprinted information listed in the Speak Up brochures in the handbooks distributed to patients/residents/clients. Methods: This descriptive pilot study will determine patient awareness of the &quot;Speak Up&quot; initiative and their &quot;right to know &quot;in preventing medical errors within the health care setting.&nbsp; The study will be conducted over a 12 month period.&nbsp; The &quot;Speak Up Initiative Survey&quot; (SUIS) is a 40-item questionnaire measuring patient?s awareness of specific Joint Commission recommended &quot;Speak Up&quot; initiatives designed to empower health consumers in prevention of medical errors while hospitalized.&nbsp; A five-point Likert scale&nbsp; is used to determine patient awareness of key initiatives with higher total scores indicating more exposure.&nbsp; The target sample population (N=100) is consenting adults who have undergone elective knee/hip replacement surgery. Discussion: &nbsp;&nbsp;Since March 2003 the Joint Commission [Research Presentation] Purpose: The aims of this presentation are to clarify the concept of physiological birth and to compare it to the related concepts of natural birth and normal birth. Methods: Concept analysis was conducted using the Walker &amp; Avant (2005) method. Results: Twelve defining attributes of physiological birth are identified.&nbsp; They are: (a) the onset of labor is spontaneous (b) labor is not augmented but proceeds spontaneously (c) no intravenous fluids are administered (d) the labor and delivery are unmedicated (no epidural) (e) no routine interventions are used (f) there is no artificial rupture of membranes (g) the laboring woman has freedom of movement (h) she uses advantageous (non-supine) pushing positions (i) episiotomy is not performed (j) the birth occurs vaginally (k) the placenta is delivered without the use of oxytocics (l) and the result of the delivery is a live newborn.&nbsp; A model case, alternative cases, antecedents, consequences, and empirical referents of physiological birth are all described. Neither 'natural birth' nor 'normal birth' are ideal terms for use in research or in practice.&nbsp; 'Natural birth' is a value-laden term with imprecise boundaries.&nbsp; 'Normal birth' is conceptually unstable because its meaning is unclear and context-specific. &nbsp;'Physiological birth' is the appropriate term to fill a critical void in the lexicon of birth care. Conclusion: In research and in practice, productive discourse about birth requires commonly accepted conceptual referents.&nbsp; Both 'natural birth' and 'normal birth' are inadequate in this regard.&nbsp; By contrast, 'physiological birth' is conceptually clear, stable, and value-neutral.&nbsp; Because its defining attributes are derived from the physiological processes of birth, and not by care practices, 'physiological birth' can be used and understood within and across cultural contexts. Reference: Walker, L. O. &amp; Avant, K. C. (2005). Strategies for theory construction in nursing (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson/Prentice Hall. &quot;Speak Up&quot; Initiative has focused on patients actively participating in the prevention of health care errors by becoming &quot;active, involved and informed participants&quot;.&nbsp; Awareness of both HCWs and patients to this initiative will help prevent medical errors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:55:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:55:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.