Do African American men and women delay for different reasons when seeking medical help for a myocardial infarction?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151229
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Do African American men and women delay for different reasons when seeking medical help for a myocardial infarction?
Abstract:
Do African American men and women delay for different reasons when seeking medical help for a myocardial infarction?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Banks, Angela D., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of San Francisco
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Kathleen Dracup, RN, DNSc, FAAN
[Research Presentation] Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify if there are gender differences in the reasons why African Americans delay in seeking medical care for symptoms of a myocardial infarction. Design: A cross-sectional descriptive design Methods: African Americans (N=61) diagnosed with an AMI, average age 60 (+/- 12) years, more than half (n=32) were women. Patients were interviewed using structured interview guides. Independent t-tests were used to test the differences in delay times. Findings: Median delay time was longer for women than men (4.4 hours vs. 3.5 hours), although the difference was not significant. Single women delayed significantly longer than single men (p= .03), and women who were alone when their symptoms started delayed longer than women who were with others (p= .03). Women who received advice to seek help or call 911 upon symptom onset had significantly shorter delays compared to women who were given other suggestions when symptoms began, (p= .01). Men at home delayed longer than men who experienced their symptoms outside the home (p= .01). Men with emergency room insurance delayed longer than men without emergency room insurance (p= .03), and men who took an ambulance to the hospital had shorter delay times than men who took other means of transportation (p= .04). Conclusion: Both men and women had prolonged delay time, although there was not a difference in delay by gender. Median delay times were substantially longer than the recommended time of less than one hour, making it difficult for most patients to fully benefit from prompt intervention of medical therapies. The findings allow clinicians to target African Americans at high risk for longer delays and to tailor educational interventions to decrease prehospital delay in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDo African American men and women delay for different reasons when seeking medical help for a myocardial infarction?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151229-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Do African American men and women delay for different reasons when seeking medical help for a myocardial infarction?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Banks, Angela D., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">adbanks@usfca.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathleen Dracup, RN, DNSc, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify if there are gender differences in the reasons why African Americans delay in seeking medical care for symptoms of a myocardial infarction. Design: A cross-sectional descriptive design Methods: African Americans (N=61) diagnosed with an AMI, average age 60 (+/- 12) years, more than half (n=32) were women. Patients were interviewed using structured interview guides. Independent t-tests were used to test the differences in delay times. Findings: Median delay time was longer for women than men (4.4 hours vs. 3.5 hours), although the difference was not significant. Single women delayed significantly longer than single men (p= .03), and women who were alone when their symptoms started delayed longer than women who were with others (p= .03). Women who received advice to seek help or call 911 upon symptom onset had significantly shorter delays compared to women who were given other suggestions when symptoms began, (p= .01). Men at home delayed longer than men who experienced their symptoms outside the home (p= .01). Men with emergency room insurance delayed longer than men without emergency room insurance (p= .03), and men who took an ambulance to the hospital had shorter delay times than men who took other means of transportation (p= .04). Conclusion: Both men and women had prolonged delay time, although there was not a difference in delay by gender. Median delay times were substantially longer than the recommended time of less than one hour, making it difficult for most patients to fully benefit from prompt intervention of medical therapies. The findings allow clinicians to target African Americans at high risk for longer delays and to tailor educational interventions to decrease prehospital delay in this population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:55:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:55:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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