The Power of Persuasion: How the perceptions of labor and delivery nurses impact the health care decisions of childbearing women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151231
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Power of Persuasion: How the perceptions of labor and delivery nurses impact the health care decisions of childbearing women
Abstract:
The Power of Persuasion: How the perceptions of labor and delivery nurses impact the health care decisions of childbearing women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Behrmann, Dena Rae, RN, MSN, CNM
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Assistant Teaching Professor
Co-Authors:Lynn Clark Callister, PhD, RN and Troy Carlton, RN, MS
[Research Presentation] Purpose/Aim: The World's estimated birth rate is currently 20.05 live births per 1,000 population, or over 130 million live births worldwide per year. Many of these births are occurring in hospitals worldwide where labor and delivery nurses are providing the primary source of care to the laboring woman. Differences in expectations and perceptions of informed laboring women and registered nurses can lead to dissatisfaction. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to identify, compare, and understand differences in perceptions and expectations between laboring women and registered nurses who provide their care. Background Information: Birth is a life changing event that can leave a lasting impact on women. Studies have reported positive birth experiences when women felt in control, when effective communication occurred, and when women felt supported, valued and treated with respect by nurses and other clinicians. Conversely, women with a negative birth experience felt a lack of support and control, reporting lower satisfaction rates. The strongest predictor of patient satisfaction is the quality of care provided by nurses Methods: A purposive, convenience sample of twenty (20) women who recently had a birth experience in three birthing units in the western United States and seventeen (17) Labor and Delivery nurses from five (5) hospitals were interviewed. Results: Indications of a successful and positive birth experience were identified along with key differences in providing labor support were identified between childbearing women and nurses. Unrealistic birth expectations by patients and unrecognized actions by nurses create a gap between expectations and actual care received Implications: Nurses all over the world need to give a higher level of care and support, while women need to be better prepared in order to have a more positive birth experience. Nurse's own personal biases, experiences and attitudes must be examined in order to provide optimal care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Power of Persuasion: How the perceptions of labor and delivery nurses impact the health care decisions of childbearing womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151231-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Power of Persuasion: How the perceptions of labor and delivery nurses impact the health care decisions of childbearing women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Behrmann, Dena Rae, RN, MSN, CNM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Teaching Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dena-behrmann@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lynn Clark Callister, PhD, RN and Troy Carlton, RN, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose/Aim: The World's estimated birth rate is currently 20.05 live births per 1,000 population, or over 130 million live births worldwide per year. Many of these births are occurring in hospitals worldwide where labor and delivery nurses are providing the primary source of care to the laboring woman. Differences in expectations and perceptions of informed laboring women and registered nurses can lead to dissatisfaction. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to identify, compare, and understand differences in perceptions and expectations between laboring women and registered nurses who provide their care. Background Information: Birth is a life changing event that can leave a lasting impact on women. Studies have reported positive birth experiences when women felt in control, when effective communication occurred, and when women felt supported, valued and treated with respect by nurses and other clinicians. Conversely, women with a negative birth experience felt a lack of support and control, reporting lower satisfaction rates. The strongest predictor of patient satisfaction is the quality of care provided by nurses Methods: A purposive, convenience sample of twenty (20) women who recently had a birth experience in three birthing units in the western United States and seventeen (17) Labor and Delivery nurses from five (5) hospitals were interviewed. Results: Indications of a successful and positive birth experience were identified along with key differences in providing labor support were identified between childbearing women and nurses. Unrealistic birth expectations by patients and unrecognized actions by nurses create a gap between expectations and actual care received Implications: Nurses all over the world need to give a higher level of care and support, while women need to be better prepared in order to have a more positive birth experience. Nurse's own personal biases, experiences and attitudes must be examined in order to provide optimal care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:55:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:55:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.