2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151248
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Collaborative Approaches for Developing Evidence-based Simulation Modules
Abstract:
Collaborative Approaches for Developing Evidence-based Simulation Modules
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Curl, Eileen Deges, PhD, ARNP-CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Lamar University
Title:Chairperson, Dept. of Nursing
Co-Authors:LeAnn Chisholm, MSN, RN; Sheila Smith, PhD, RN and Leah Anne McGee, MSN, MEd
[Research Presentation] Restricted clinical space for learning experiences forces nursing programs to turn away qualified students. This problem is especially acute in clinical specialty areas with limited beds (e.g., critical care). In order to increase the capacity of nursing programs, three institutions of higher learning collaborated to develop high fidelity simulation modules to replace a portion of the hospital experience. The three academic institutions also collaborated to develop a central simulation lab for use by nursing students from all three programs. Through the central lab, students gain experience in clinical areas most restricting the capacity of the nursing programs: obstetrics, pediatrics, mental health and critical care. To insure that case scenarios depicted in the simulation modules reflected real world clinical experiences, focus groups were held with 45 expert clinical nurses from four regional hospitals partnering on the project. Expert nurses in obstetrics, pediatrics, mental health and critical care at each of the hospitals were asked to identify the top five client problems the nurses thought should be addressed in the simulation modules. Next the expert nurses were asked to identify patient characteristics, family situations, environmental factors (home and community), regional cultural factors, and treatment implications for four of the top five client problems. Analysis of focus group data resulted in the identification of 20 nursing concepts (e.g., respiratory distress, tissue perfusion, teen pregnancy, cognitive disorders) and 62 associated medical diagnoses. Following data analysis, member checking with the expert nurses was used to validate the results. Next evidence-based simulation modules were developed for the 20 concepts and related patient/family situations to exemplifying reality-based nursing practice. Student feedback has been overwhelmingly positive about the use of evidence-based simulation modules to enhance their clinical knowledge and skills.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCollaborative Approaches for Developing Evidence-based Simulation Modulesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151248-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Collaborative Approaches for Developing Evidence-based Simulation Modules</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Curl, Eileen Deges, PhD, ARNP-CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lamar University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Chairperson, Dept. of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eileen.curl@lamar.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">LeAnn Chisholm, MSN, RN; Sheila Smith, PhD, RN and Leah Anne McGee, MSN, MEd</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Restricted clinical space for learning experiences forces nursing programs to turn away qualified students. This problem is especially acute in clinical specialty areas with limited beds (e.g., critical care). In order to increase the capacity of nursing programs, three institutions of higher learning collaborated to develop high fidelity simulation modules to replace a portion of the hospital experience. The three academic institutions also collaborated to develop a central simulation lab for use by nursing students from all three programs. Through the central lab, students gain experience in clinical areas most restricting the capacity of the nursing programs: obstetrics, pediatrics, mental health and critical care. To insure that case scenarios depicted in the simulation modules reflected real world clinical experiences, focus groups were held with 45 expert clinical nurses from four regional hospitals partnering on the project. Expert nurses in obstetrics, pediatrics, mental health and critical care at each of the hospitals were asked to identify the top five client problems the nurses thought should be addressed in the simulation modules. Next the expert nurses were asked to identify patient characteristics, family situations, environmental factors (home and community), regional cultural factors, and treatment implications for four of the top five client problems. Analysis of focus group data resulted in the identification of 20 nursing concepts (e.g., respiratory distress, tissue perfusion, teen pregnancy, cognitive disorders) and 62 associated medical diagnoses. Following data analysis, member checking with the expert nurses was used to validate the results. Next evidence-based simulation modules were developed for the 20 concepts and related patient/family situations to exemplifying reality-based nursing practice. Student feedback has been overwhelmingly positive about the use of evidence-based simulation modules to enhance their clinical knowledge and skills.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:56:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:56:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.