2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151267
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes of a Nurse-Managed Diabetic Foot Clinic
Abstract:
Outcomes of a Nurse-Managed Diabetic Foot Clinic
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Gilcreast, Darlene Mary, RN, PhD, MSN, CDE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio
Title:assistant professor
Co-Authors:Beverly Sue Rose, MSN; Janet F. Stansberry, MSN; Debra D. Mark, PhD and Paul C. Lewis, PhD
[Research Presentation] Aims/Objectives:á To determine whether a nurse-managed diabetic foot clinic will decrease lesions, improve overall health, and reduce healthcare costs for patients with diabetes.áFramework: The Chronic Disease Model defines outcomes based on the patient, healthcare system, and support systems. Incidence of foot wounds with diabetes is approximately 15% with 7 per 1,000 progressing to amputation/year at $30,000 each. Reduced productivity and quality of life are significant with wounds or amputation.áResearch Design: An experimental randomized, controlled design enrolled 128 adults with diabetes for 1 year who were at high risk or very high risk for foot wounds. Dependent variables were: lesion rates, health status, and healthcare costs. Treatment was well-foot care (nails trimmed, calluses filed, pressure off-loading, and wound care) plus education. The control group received education only. Each visit, participants received foot assessment. High-risk feet in the treatment group were seen every 3 months and very-high-risk feet were seen every 2 months. Control participants were seen every three months regardless of category. Control participants were referred to healthcare providers if needed. The Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 was completed at enrollment and the end of 1 year. A patient satisfaction survey was done at the end. A 1-year healthcare utilization survey was completed and times of visits were measured to calculate costs. Data Analysis: Z-tests, chi-square, and t-tests were used.áStudy Findings: Fewer lesions occurred on visit 1 in treatment participants than control although not statistically significant (10 vs.13; chi squareá= 0.820, p=0.636). At visit 5, 18.7% more lesions occurred in control than treatment participants (12 vs. 8, statistically significant chi squareá=4.385, p=0.034). There were a mean 8.4% fewer lesions in the treatment group overall demonstrating effectiveness of nursing interventions to prevent foot wounds.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutcomes of a Nurse-Managed Diabetic Foot Clinicen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151267-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Outcomes of a Nurse-Managed Diabetic Foot Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gilcreast, Darlene Mary, RN, PhD, MSN, CDE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">assistant professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gilcreast@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Beverly Sue Rose, MSN; Janet F. Stansberry, MSN; Debra D. Mark, PhD and Paul C. Lewis, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Aims/Objectives:&aacute; To determine whether a nurse-managed diabetic foot clinic will decrease lesions, improve overall health, and reduce healthcare costs for patients with diabetes.&aacute;Framework: The Chronic Disease Model defines outcomes based on the patient, healthcare system, and support systems. Incidence of foot wounds with diabetes is approximately 15% with 7 per 1,000 progressing to amputation/year at $30,000 each. Reduced productivity and quality of life are significant with wounds or amputation.&aacute;Research Design: An experimental randomized, controlled design enrolled 128 adults with diabetes for 1 year who were at high risk or very high risk for foot wounds. Dependent variables were: lesion rates, health status, and healthcare costs. Treatment was well-foot care (nails trimmed, calluses filed, pressure off-loading, and wound care) plus education. The control group received education only. Each visit, participants received foot assessment. High-risk feet in the treatment group were seen every 3 months and very-high-risk feet were seen every 2 months. Control participants were seen every three months regardless of category. Control participants were referred to healthcare providers if needed. The Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 was completed at enrollment and the end of 1 year. A patient satisfaction survey was done at the end. A 1-year healthcare utilization survey was completed and times of visits were measured to calculate costs. Data Analysis: Z-tests, chi-square, and t-tests were used.&aacute;Study Findings: Fewer lesions occurred on visit 1 in treatment participants than control although not statistically significant (10 vs.13; chi square&aacute;= 0.820, p=0.636). At visit 5, 18.7% more lesions occurred in control than treatment participants (12 vs. 8, statistically significant chi square&aacute;=4.385, p=0.034). There were a mean 8.4% fewer lesions in the treatment group overall demonstrating effectiveness of nursing interventions to prevent foot wounds.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:56:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:56:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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