2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151281
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Increasing hardiness among nurse managers: A longitudinal approach
Abstract:
Increasing hardiness among nurse managers: A longitudinal approach
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Judkins, Sharon Kay, RN, PhD, CNAA, BC
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Texas at Arlington
Title:director, nursing administration program
Co-Authors:Leslie Furlow, RN, PhD, C-FNP and Terryl Kendricks, RN, MSN
[Research Presentation] Background: Hardiness has been determined to be a resilience factor with stress (Kobasa). Hardy individuals recognize they have options to exercise judgment (control), opportunities to become actively involved in various life activities (commitment), and ability to perceive change as beneficial (challenge) (Pollock). Links of hardiness to decreased stress may be helpful to nurse managers. Previous studies have determined that hardiness can be learned and sustained (Rowe). Aims: To determine effects of longitudinal hardiness training among nurse managers in an acute-care hospital; to compare hardiness and turnover rates among nursing staff. Methods: This longitudinal descriptive study examined hardiness among a convenience sample of 12 managers attending a hardiness training program (HTP) in 2006. Using a pre/posttest format, pre-testing occurred after 2.5 days of initial training. Post-testings occurred after initial training (post 1), after 6 weekly 2-hour sessions (post 2), and after a 2-hour session at 5 months (post 3). In addition, turnover rates were compared to the 5-months prior to and following hardiness training. The Hardiness Scale was used to measure hardiness (Bartone, et al.). Results: Paired samples t-test revealed a significant (p<.05) increase in hardiness levels pre [M=2.08(.17)] to post 1 [M=2.12(.13)] and no significant changes post 1 to 2 [M=2.1(.24)], nor post 2 to 3 [M=2.2(.27)]. No significant correlation was determined between hardiness levels and turnover rates. Discussion: Hardiness scores were increased and sustained over a 5 month time period after attending hardiness training. Although not significant, turnover rates did decrease 6.8% by the end of the 10 month training period. Conclusions: Attending a longitudinal HTP may increase and sustain hardiness among nurse managers, thus proving invaluable to healthcare organizations as resiliency against workplace stressors is increased. Further, increasing hardiness has the potential to positively influence workplace culture when dealing with burnout, productivity, job satisfaction, and absenteeism.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncreasing hardiness among nurse managers: A longitudinal approachen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151281-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Increasing hardiness among nurse managers: A longitudinal approach</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Judkins, Sharon Kay, RN, PhD, CNAA, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Texas at Arlington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">director, nursing administration program</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">judkins@uta.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Leslie Furlow, RN, PhD, C-FNP and Terryl Kendricks, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Background: Hardiness has been determined to be a resilience factor with stress (Kobasa). Hardy individuals recognize they have options to exercise judgment (control), opportunities to become actively involved in various life activities (commitment), and ability to perceive change as beneficial (challenge) (Pollock). Links of hardiness to decreased stress may be helpful to nurse managers. Previous studies have determined that hardiness can be learned and sustained (Rowe). Aims: To determine effects of longitudinal hardiness training among nurse managers in an acute-care hospital; to compare hardiness and turnover rates among nursing staff. Methods: This longitudinal descriptive study examined hardiness among a convenience sample of 12 managers attending a hardiness training program (HTP) in 2006. Using a pre/posttest format, pre-testing occurred after 2.5 days of initial training. Post-testings occurred after initial training (post 1), after 6 weekly 2-hour sessions (post 2), and after a 2-hour session at 5 months (post 3). In addition, turnover rates were compared to the 5-months prior to and following hardiness training. The Hardiness Scale was used to measure hardiness (Bartone, et al.). Results: Paired samples t-test revealed a significant (p&lt;.05) increase in hardiness levels pre [M=2.08(.17)] to post 1 [M=2.12(.13)] and no significant changes post 1 to 2 [M=2.1(.24)], nor post 2 to 3 [M=2.2(.27)]. No significant correlation was determined between hardiness levels and turnover rates. Discussion: Hardiness scores were increased and sustained over a 5 month time period after attending hardiness training. Although not significant, turnover rates did decrease 6.8% by the end of the 10 month training period. Conclusions: Attending a longitudinal HTP may increase and sustain hardiness among nurse managers, thus proving invaluable to healthcare organizations as resiliency against workplace stressors is increased. Further, increasing hardiness has the potential to positively influence workplace culture when dealing with burnout, productivity, job satisfaction, and absenteeism.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:57:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:57:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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