2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151283
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reflective writing: A healing voice for the silent
Abstract:
Reflective writing: A healing voice for the silent
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Kennison, Monica, EdD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:West Liberty State College
Title:Nursing Program Director
[Evidence-based Presentation] Reflective writing is a powerful, albeit somewhat elusive, intervention for clients who have experienced a traumatic event, particularly for those individuals who would otherwise remain silent. Despite research in the behavioral sciences, there is a paucity of nursing research on the therapeutic effects of reflective writing. This presentation aims to present results of a reflective writing intervention with two clients, one with reflex sympathetic dystrophy and another with bulimia. Concluding the presentation are questions for further research. In this reflective writing intervention two clients were experiencing traumatic health problems. Each had limited opportunities to disclose their thoughts and feelings. Patty, a married thirty-five year old mother of two, was newly diagnosed with reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Marissa, a married twenty-eight year old mother of one, had a longstanding history of bulimia. Both women agreed to participate in a three month reflective writing intervention that consisted of continuous writing for fifteen minutes at least three to four times a week. The women were advised to write about their deepest thoughts and feelings related to significant issues they were experiencing. Both agreed to share their reflective writings. The reflective writings were carefully analyzed for themes following a constant comparative approach. Follow-up interviews clarified themes. Verbatim remarks were used to explicate findings. Themes included: finding goodness; sharing to help others; deepening strength though not my own; and becoming more of myself.áFindings indicated that the reflective writing intervention was a highly valuable approach to finding meaning in the traumatic experiences of reflex sympathetic dystrophy and bulimia. Further research is indicated to determine the significance of reflective writing intervention for clients with undisclosed traumatic experiences. For instance, does a reflective writing intervention improve measures of stress and depression in clients with a history of sexual abuse?
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReflective writing: A healing voice for the silenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151283-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reflective writing: A healing voice for the silent</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kennison, Monica, EdD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">West Liberty State College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing Program Director</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mkennison@westliberty.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Presentation] Reflective writing is a powerful, albeit somewhat elusive, intervention for clients who have experienced a traumatic event, particularly for those individuals who would otherwise remain silent. Despite research in the behavioral sciences, there is a paucity of nursing research on the therapeutic effects of reflective writing. This presentation aims to present results of a reflective writing intervention with two clients, one with reflex sympathetic dystrophy and another with bulimia. Concluding the presentation are questions for further research. In this reflective writing intervention two clients were experiencing traumatic health problems. Each had limited opportunities to disclose their thoughts and feelings. Patty, a married thirty-five year old mother of two, was newly diagnosed with reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Marissa, a married twenty-eight year old mother of one, had a longstanding history of bulimia. Both women agreed to participate in a three month reflective writing intervention that consisted of continuous writing for fifteen minutes at least three to four times a week. The women were advised to write about their deepest thoughts and feelings related to significant issues they were experiencing. Both agreed to share their reflective writings. The reflective writings were carefully analyzed for themes following a constant comparative approach. Follow-up interviews clarified themes. Verbatim remarks were used to explicate findings. Themes included: finding goodness; sharing to help others; deepening strength though not my own; and becoming more of myself.&aacute;Findings indicated that the reflective writing intervention was a highly valuable approach to finding meaning in the traumatic experiences of reflex sympathetic dystrophy and bulimia. Further research is indicated to determine the significance of reflective writing intervention for clients with undisclosed traumatic experiences. For instance, does a reflective writing intervention improve measures of stress and depression in clients with a history of sexual abuse?</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:57:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:57:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.