Individual and Collaborative Role Impact of Reflective Practice on Administrative Graduate Nursing Students: A Qualitative Retrospective Data Analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151311
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Individual and Collaborative Role Impact of Reflective Practice on Administrative Graduate Nursing Students: A Qualitative Retrospective Data Analysis
Abstract:
Individual and Collaborative Role Impact of Reflective Practice on Administrative Graduate Nursing Students: A Qualitative Retrospective Data Analysis
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:McKenzie, Carole A., PhD, CNM
P.I. Institution Name:Northwestern Oklahoma State University
Title:Associate Professor and Chairperson
Co-Authors:Jackie McVey, PhD, RN; Sue Thompson, PhD, RN and James L. Bowen, PhD
[Research Presentation] This reflective practice project focused on how nurses in mid-level management were influenced by a graduate school assignment on reflective examination of critical role interactions. Findings were part of a larger study that focused on the use of reflective practice strategies to guide role transition (Bridges, 2003, 2004;áMeleis, 1975) for undergraduate and graduate nursing students anticipating new or revised work responsibilities. Reflection focused on the process of internalization of experiences and their meaning. Graduate students in a nursing administration course completed a reflective journal and a áreflective leadership paper, with criteria based on Johns' work á(1993, 2004).áCritical incidents discussed centered on management and leadership situations that were unresolved or role disparities. A qualitative, retrospective approach was utilized to analyze the narrative data.áNurses involved in the course assignments reported a wide variety of insights that reflected the same three themes in the larger study. Those themes were Perspectives, Emotional Experiences, and Engagement in the Reflective Process. All of the students had epiphany moments of clarity that assisted them in moving forward in their administrative career. Several gave examples of profound experiences that helped them clarify their roles and to resolve ongoing collaborative issues such as conflict within the health care team. One student initiated orientation and staff development programs based on reflective group processes. Data results suggest that guided reflective strategies help nurses resolve key issues in health care management and administration. Ongoing placement of study results within nursing practice and research literature support the importance of reflective practice in developing role accountability and reducing role disparity. The development of accountability is seen as an internal process (O'Grady & Malloch, 2006) and is a step in leading nurses to excellence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIndividual and Collaborative Role Impact of Reflective Practice on Administrative Graduate Nursing Students: A Qualitative Retrospective Data Analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151311-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Individual and Collaborative Role Impact of Reflective Practice on Administrative Graduate Nursing Students: A Qualitative Retrospective Data Analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McKenzie, Carole A., PhD, CNM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northwestern Oklahoma State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Chairperson</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">camckenzie@nwosu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jackie McVey, PhD, RN; Sue Thompson, PhD, RN and James L. Bowen, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] This reflective practice project focused on how nurses in mid-level management were influenced by a graduate school assignment on reflective examination of critical role interactions. Findings were part of a larger study that focused on the use of reflective practice strategies to guide role transition (Bridges, 2003, 2004;&aacute;Meleis, 1975) for undergraduate and graduate nursing students anticipating new or revised work responsibilities. Reflection focused on the process of internalization of experiences and their meaning. Graduate students in a nursing administration course completed a reflective journal and a &aacute;reflective leadership paper, with criteria based on Johns' work &aacute;(1993, 2004).&aacute;Critical incidents discussed centered on management and leadership situations that were unresolved or role disparities. A qualitative, retrospective approach was utilized to analyze the narrative data.&aacute;Nurses involved in the course assignments reported a wide variety of insights that reflected the same three themes in the larger study. Those themes were Perspectives, Emotional Experiences, and Engagement in the Reflective Process. All of the students had epiphany moments of clarity that assisted them in moving forward in their administrative career. Several gave examples of profound experiences that helped them clarify their roles and to resolve ongoing collaborative issues such as conflict within the health care team. One student initiated orientation and staff development programs based on reflective group processes. Data results suggest that guided reflective strategies help nurses resolve key issues in health care management and administration. Ongoing placement of study results within nursing practice and research literature support the importance of reflective practice in developing role accountability and reducing role disparity. The development of accountability is seen as an internal process (O'Grady &amp; Malloch, 2006) and is a step in leading nurses to excellence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:58:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:58:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.