Apprehension levels of Chinese and American Nurses in caring for the dying Patient. An International Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151330
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Apprehension levels of Chinese and American Nurses in caring for the dying Patient. An International Study
Abstract:
Apprehension levels of Chinese and American Nurses in caring for the dying Patient. An International Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Reyna, Krista, MS, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Mercy Health Center
Title:Manager of Palliative Care
Co-Authors:Gary Dean Parker, MS, BSN; Chris Weigel, MS, BSN and Linda Theresa Fanning, BSN, RN, MS
[Research Presentation] Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate what similarities and differences there were in apprehension levels in nurses form China and The United States, in regards to caring for the dying patient. Another area investigated is how culture may play a part in these nurses' attitudes. Method: 183 nurses representing 11 units from The Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital in Hangzhou, China and 151 nurses representing 7 units from Mercy Health Center in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in The United Sates were administered the Professional End-of-Life care Attitude Scale (PEAS). The PEAS allows us to identify the level of apprehension nurses have in caring for dying patients. The PEAS will also allow us to measure differences in attitudes by professional degree, gender, and years of experience. Results: A series of one way ANOVAs and Z - tests showed that there is similarities across cultures in perceived apprehension in interacting with dying patients, whether it is framed in terms of personal impact or in light of one's professional role as a nurse/health care provider. Generally, this speaks to the universality of the apprehension health care professionals feel about interacting with terminally ill persons and their families, irrespective of the cultural context in which such interactions occur. Conclusion: This is the first time a study of this magnitude has been conducted comparing nurse's attitudes in China and the United States concerning the care of the dying patient. These results will help nurses not only in China and The United States, but all nurses who care for dying patients. This data shows that there should be more direct contact for all nurses in regards to end of life care, no matter their country of origin.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApprehension levels of Chinese and American Nurses in caring for the dying Patient. An International Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151330-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Apprehension levels of Chinese and American Nurses in caring for the dying Patient. An International Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reyna, Krista, MS, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mercy Health Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Manager of Palliative Care</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Kreyna@ok.mercy.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gary Dean Parker, MS, BSN; Chris Weigel, MS, BSN and Linda Theresa Fanning, BSN, RN, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate what similarities and differences there were in apprehension levels in nurses form China and The United States, in regards to caring for the dying patient. Another area investigated is how culture may play a part in these nurses' attitudes. Method: 183 nurses representing 11 units from The Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital in Hangzhou, China and 151 nurses representing 7 units from Mercy Health Center in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in The United Sates were administered the Professional End-of-Life care Attitude Scale (PEAS). The PEAS allows us to identify the level of apprehension nurses have in caring for dying patients. The PEAS will also allow us to measure differences in attitudes by professional degree, gender, and years of experience. Results: A series of one way ANOVAs and Z - tests showed that there is similarities across cultures in perceived apprehension in interacting with dying patients, whether it is framed in terms of personal impact or in light of one's professional role as a nurse/health care provider. Generally, this speaks to the universality of the apprehension health care professionals feel about interacting with terminally ill persons and their families, irrespective of the cultural context in which such interactions occur. Conclusion: This is the first time a study of this magnitude has been conducted comparing nurse's attitudes in China and the United States concerning the care of the dying patient. These results will help nurses not only in China and The United States, but all nurses who care for dying patients. This data shows that there should be more direct contact for all nurses in regards to end of life care, no matter their country of origin.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:58:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:58:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.