Exploring Chronic Sorrow Among Female Victims of Child Abuse Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuse

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151347
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring Chronic Sorrow Among Female Victims of Child Abuse Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuse
Abstract:
Exploring Chronic Sorrow Among Female Victims of Child Abuse Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuse
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Slaughter-Smith, Cheryl, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Arkansas Tech University
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing
[Evidence-based Presentation] Background: Substance abuse/dependence is a national problem. Women account for 6.2 percent of the overall population reporting illegal drug use. The rate of substance abuse among adolescent females continues to rise. Alcohol and illegal drug use among pregnant women is a concern as is the fact that women with substance abuse problems are often the primary providers for families. Although several studies address substance abuse and women in general, there is little information about the feelings or experiences that trigger relapse in women from their perspective. Purpose: To describe the feelings and experiences female child abuse victims currently in substance abuse treatment for relapse identify as relapse triggers. Method: In this qualitative descriptive study, the researcher conducted interviews with a purposive sample of twelve women in a residential treatment program. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria guided the sample selection process.á Data collection continued until data saturation was reached. Semi-structured interviews guided by the Burke/NCRCS Chronic Sorrow questionnaire, field notes and a demographic questionnaire served as the measures used to generate data. Findings: Three common themes were interwoven in the narrative stories of these women: blocking feelings, relapse triggers, and mothering loss. Eighty three percent reported the use of alcohol or drugs as a means to block feelings of sadness, anger, frustration and loneliness secondary to loss experiences. Mothering loss was a theme that transcended from childhood into adulthood. Advice participants offered to women in similar situations reflected interpersonal, cognitive and action-focused coping strategies. Implications: This study emphasizes the impact loss and re-experiencing feelings has on relapse among this sample of women. áIn addition, the theme of mothering loss can be incorporated into current substance abuse treatment programs in an effort to promote relapse prevention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring Chronic Sorrow Among Female Victims of Child Abuse Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151347-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exploring Chronic Sorrow Among Female Victims of Child Abuse Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuse</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Slaughter-Smith, Cheryl, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arkansas Tech University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cheryl.smith@atu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Presentation] Background: Substance abuse/dependence is a national problem. Women account for 6.2 percent of the overall population reporting illegal drug use. The rate of substance abuse among adolescent females continues to rise. Alcohol and illegal drug use among pregnant women is a concern as is the fact that women with substance abuse problems are often the primary providers for families. Although several studies address substance abuse and women in general, there is little information about the feelings or experiences that trigger relapse in women from their perspective. Purpose: To describe the feelings and experiences female child abuse victims currently in substance abuse treatment for relapse identify as relapse triggers. Method: In this qualitative descriptive study, the researcher conducted interviews with a purposive sample of twelve women in a residential treatment program. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria guided the sample selection process.&aacute; Data collection continued until data saturation was reached. Semi-structured interviews guided by the Burke/NCRCS Chronic Sorrow questionnaire, field notes and a demographic questionnaire served as the measures used to generate data. Findings: Three common themes were interwoven in the narrative stories of these women: blocking feelings, relapse triggers, and mothering loss. Eighty three percent reported the use of alcohol or drugs as a means to block feelings of sadness, anger, frustration and loneliness secondary to loss experiences. Mothering loss was a theme that transcended from childhood into adulthood. Advice participants offered to women in similar situations reflected interpersonal, cognitive and action-focused coping strategies. Implications: This study emphasizes the impact loss and re-experiencing feelings has on relapse among this sample of women. &aacute;In addition, the theme of mothering loss can be incorporated into current substance abuse treatment programs in an effort to promote relapse prevention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:59:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:59:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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