Physical Measurements of Oxygen Saturation and Blood Volume by Near Infrared Spectroscopy in the Preterm Infant

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151363
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physical Measurements of Oxygen Saturation and Blood Volume by Near Infrared Spectroscopy in the Preterm Infant
Abstract:
Physical Measurements of Oxygen Saturation and Blood Volume by Near Infrared Spectroscopy in the Preterm Infant
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Boone, Karen, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Louisville
Title:Graduate Research Assistant
Co-Authors:Rosalie O. Mainous, PhD, RNC, NNP; Kyung Kang, PhD
An exploratory study was performed to evaluate accuracy and precision of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) used to measure oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin levels in cerebral tissue of preterm infants.  This collaborative work is being performed in conjunction with a chemical engineer.  The NIRS instrument, developed in the engineering lab for use on the adult human leg vasculature, will need to be adapted to the preterm population.  In order to do this, a three step process was undertaken.  First, an evaluation of the baseline values for NIRS was undertaken with five preterm subjects.  Head measurements were taken and spectral tracings measured optical densities at two wavelengths of light.  These subjects showed that the initial probe design was not optimal for accurate data collection of optical densities and that infants with a great deal of head hair did not have precise findings. Design recommendations are being made.  Next, using the instrument on the forearm of the researcher, a signal to noise ratio was calculated and showed that specific patterns of movement could be identified on the spectral tracing.  Two types of movement were evaluated. This information has potential clinical implications for determining when there is artifact in the signal, but needs testing in a larger sample with a reconfigured probe.  Finally, the instrument will be placed on the head of a baby doll the size of a preterm infant and the accuracy of the signal will be tested for drift over at least five minutes.  These findings will be reported as they become available.  These initial tests of accuracy and precision will help to refine this instrument for testing in the neonatal population.  Information garnered from NIRS in cerebral tissue may be extremely valuable in predicting oscillations in cerebral flow, blood volume and tissue oxygenation levels on routinely occurring events in the NICU.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysical Measurements of Oxygen Saturation and Blood Volume by Near Infrared Spectroscopy in the Preterm Infanten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151363-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physical Measurements of Oxygen Saturation and Blood Volume by Near Infrared Spectroscopy in the Preterm Infant</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Boone, Karen, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Louisville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">k0boon01@louisville.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Rosalie O. Mainous, PhD, RNC, NNP; Kyung Kang, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">An exploratory study was performed to evaluate accuracy and precision of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) used to measure oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin levels in cerebral tissue of preterm infants.&nbsp; This collaborative work is being performed in conjunction with a chemical engineer.&nbsp; The NIRS instrument, developed in the engineering lab for use on the adult human leg vasculature, will need to be adapted to the preterm population.&nbsp; In order to do this, a three step process was undertaken.&nbsp; First, an evaluation of the baseline values for NIRS was undertaken with five preterm subjects.&nbsp; Head measurements were taken and spectral tracings measured optical densities at two wavelengths of light.&nbsp; These subjects showed that the initial probe design was not optimal for accurate data collection of optical densities and that infants with a great deal of head hair did not have precise findings. Design recommendations are being made.&nbsp; Next, using the instrument on the forearm of the researcher, a signal to noise ratio was calculated and showed that specific patterns of movement could be identified on the spectral tracing.&nbsp; Two types of movement were evaluated. This information has potential clinical implications for determining when there is artifact in the signal, but needs testing in a larger sample with a reconfigured probe.&nbsp; Finally, the instrument will be placed on the head of a baby doll the size of a preterm infant and the accuracy of the signal will be tested for drift over at least five minutes.&nbsp; These findings will be reported as they become available.&nbsp; These initial tests of accuracy and precision will help to refine this instrument for testing in the neonatal population.&nbsp; Information garnered from NIRS in cerebral tissue may be extremely valuable in predicting oscillations in cerebral flow, blood volume and tissue oxygenation levels on routinely occurring events in the NICU.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:59:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:59:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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