2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151366
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using an Evidence-based Practice Team to Develop an Algorithm for Skin Care
Abstract:
Using an Evidence-based Practice Team to Develop an Algorithm for Skin Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Brewer, Melanie, DNSc, RN, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:Phoenix Children's Hospital
Title:Director of Clinical Outcomes and Nursing Research
Co-Authors:Judy O'Haver, RN, MS, CPNP
Background: The Institute for Healthcare Improvement and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality have identified skin care and prevention of pressure ulcers in the acute care setting as indicators of health care quality for infants and children. Evidence-based skin care standards are needed.  An evidence-based practice team convened to evaluate outcomes of skin care in a pediatric hospital and to develop a guideline for practice.  A systematic review of the literature was conducted and a valid and reliable risk assessment tool was identified. Methods: A prevalence study was conducted over a 12-hour period in a 274-bed Children?s Hospital in the southwest.  The Braden Q Scale for Predicting Pressure Ulcer Risk is a sensitive scale for predicting children at risk for pressure ulcer development (Curley, Quigley & Lin, 2003), and was used to evaluate risk among hospitalized neonatal and pediatric patients.  Demographic and clinical information was collected and physical assessments were conducted to determine the presence of pressure ulcers and alterations in skin integrity.  The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel staging system (2003) was used to stage areas of skin alteration.  Bed surface and documented skin care practices were also collected. Results: Of 222 children evaluated (99% of those hospitalized), two Stage I pressure ulcers were found. No ulcers more severe than a Stage I were noted. The Braden Q scores, skin assessment, clinical documentation and skin care practices were compared across groups.  Differences noted and skin integrity alterations will be presented.  An algorithm for guiding skin care practices was developed.  Conclusions:  Skin care practices and the use of a risk assessment scale can be used to guide the development of an algorithm to prevent pressure ulcer formation. Use of an evidence-based algorithm to guide nursing practice will reduce practice variation and decrease the risk of compromise to skin integrity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing an Evidence-based Practice Team to Develop an Algorithm for Skin Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151366-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using an Evidence-based Practice Team to Develop an Algorithm for Skin Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brewer, Melanie, DNSc, RN, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Phoenix Children's Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Clinical Outcomes and Nursing Research</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">melanie.brewer@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judy O'Haver, RN, MS, CPNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The Institute for Healthcare Improvement and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality have identified skin care and prevention of pressure ulcers in the acute care setting as indicators of health care quality for infants and children. Evidence-based skin care standards are needed.&nbsp; An evidence-based practice team convened to evaluate outcomes of skin care in a pediatric&nbsp;hospital and to develop a guideline for practice.&nbsp; A systematic review of the literature was conducted and a valid and reliable risk assessment tool was identified. Methods: A prevalence study was conducted over a 12-hour period in a 274-bed Children?s Hospital in the southwest.&nbsp; The Braden Q Scale for Predicting Pressure Ulcer Risk is a sensitive scale for predicting children at risk for pressure ulcer development (Curley, Quigley &amp; Lin, 2003), and was used to evaluate risk among hospitalized neonatal and pediatric patients.&nbsp; Demographic and clinical information was collected and physical assessments were conducted to determine the presence of pressure ulcers and alterations in skin integrity.&nbsp; The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel staging system (2003) was used to stage areas of skin alteration. &nbsp;Bed surface and documented skin care practices were also collected. Results: Of 222 children evaluated (99% of those hospitalized), two Stage I pressure ulcers were found. No ulcers more severe than a Stage I were noted. The Braden Q scores, skin assessment, clinical documentation and skin care practices were compared across groups.&nbsp; Differences noted and skin integrity alterations will be presented.&nbsp; An algorithm for guiding skin care practices was developed.&nbsp; Conclusions:&nbsp; Skin care practices and the use of a risk assessment scale can be used to guide the development of an algorithm to prevent pressure ulcer formation. Use of an evidence-based algorithm to guide nursing practice will reduce practice variation and decrease the risk of compromise to skin integrity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:59:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:59:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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