2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151368
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Facilitating Risk-Reduction Among Homeless Youth
Abstract:
Facilitating Risk-Reduction Among Homeless Youth
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Busen, Nancy, RN, PhD, FNP, BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas, Health Science Center at Houston
Title:associate professor
Introduction: Although the exact number of homeless adolescents is unknown, it is estimated that approximately two million youth experience homelessness, living in shelters, crash pads, the streets, or other transient unstable situations. Providing mental and medical health care services for homeless youth remains elusive despite intervention programs that have been developed to meet their needs. The purpose of this study is to (1) describe a group of homeless adolescents who utilize a mobile health care unit that provides medical and mental health care services and (2) examine data based on a qualitative framework to examine risk-reduction in this sample. Methods: The first phase of the study was a retrospective chart audit conducted on 100 records of homeless youth. In addition to demographics, data were examined for psychiatric and medical diagnoses, reasons for homelessness, sexual identity, substance abuse, history of past physical, emotional, and sexual abuse, number of visits and overall outcome at termination of services. The second phase of the study is currently on going. Results: Data were obtained from 95 records of mostly heterosexual youth between the ages of 15 to 25 years. Most were unemployed without health insurance. Approximately half the sample were high school graduates/GED living in shelters, crash pads or the streets. Multiple abuses accounted for the greater majority leaving home. Females suffered greater physical and sexual abuse than males but males were more frequently abandoned than females. Multiple psychiatric conditions and substance abuse were common denominators and medical diagnoses related to transient living situations, substance abuse and sexual activity. Success of the program was associated with stabilizing youth on psychotropic medications, decreasing substance use, providing birth control and immunizations, and treating medical conditions. Discussion: When evaluating programs that provide services for homeless youth, investigators need to examine risk-reduction outcomes in the context of the environment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFacilitating Risk-Reduction Among Homeless Youthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151368-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Facilitating Risk-Reduction Among Homeless Youth</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Busen, Nancy, RN, PhD, FNP, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas, Health Science Center at Houston</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">associate professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Nancy.H.Busen@uth.tmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: Although the exact number of homeless adolescents is unknown, it is estimated that approximately two million youth experience homelessness, living in shelters, crash pads, the streets, or other transient unstable situations. Providing mental and medical health care services for homeless youth remains elusive despite intervention programs that have been developed to meet their needs. The purpose of this study is to (1) describe a group of homeless adolescents who utilize a mobile health care unit that provides medical and mental health care services and (2) examine data based on a qualitative framework to examine risk-reduction in this sample. Methods: The first phase of the study was a retrospective chart audit conducted on 100 records of homeless youth. In addition to demographics, data were examined for psychiatric and medical diagnoses, reasons for homelessness, sexual identity, substance abuse, history of past physical, emotional, and sexual abuse, number of visits and overall outcome at termination of services. The second phase of the study is currently on going. Results: Data were obtained from 95 records of mostly heterosexual youth between the ages of 15 to 25 years. Most were unemployed without health insurance. Approximately half the sample were high school graduates/GED living in shelters, crash pads or the streets. Multiple abuses accounted for the greater majority leaving home. Females suffered greater physical and sexual abuse than males but males were more frequently abandoned than females. Multiple psychiatric conditions and substance abuse were common denominators and medical diagnoses related to transient living situations, substance abuse and sexual activity. Success of the program was associated with stabilizing youth on psychotropic medications, decreasing substance use, providing birth control and immunizations, and treating medical conditions. Discussion: When evaluating programs that provide services for homeless youth, investigators need to examine risk-reduction outcomes in the context of the environment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:00:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:00:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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