2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151369
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Life Review at End of Life: Measures of Outcomes, A Pilot Study
Abstract:
Life Review at End of Life: Measures of Outcomes, A Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Butler, Frieda R., PhD, RN, MPH
P.I. Institution Name:George Mason University
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Amani Babgi, BSN
The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of a life review intervention with terminally ill elderly persons to facilitate a peaceful end of life. Peaceful end of life was defined as having: 1. recognition of one?s having had a purpose in life, 2. an intuitive understanding of self, 3. possessing a sense of self determination, 4. reconciliation of issues of forgiveness, and 5. acceptance of one?s own death.  A mixed methods approach consisted of 1. conducting a life review  of hospice patients in their homes using The Life Review and Experiencing Guide (Haight, 1992); 2. administering a modified 5-point LAP-R Likert Scale, (Reker, 1994); and 3. conducting a post life review interview using a guide developed by the PI to determine the outcomes of the life review. Results showed that all of the participants perceived the life review as an enjoyable experience and half of these indicated feelings of peacefulness and completeness as a result of the life review. All but one subject stated that this procedure was helpful. Participants scored higher on the LAP-R dimensions of: 1. meaning and purpose in life, on choice/responsibleness, and on 3. death acceptance. Mean scores on these dimensions ranged from 3.67 ? 5.00. They scored lowest on items indicating achievement of life?s goals and fulfillment, withdrawal from life, and perceiving life as boring and uneventful. Mean scores on these items ranged from 1.50-3.83. Conclusions:  The intervention of a life review provided the majority of participants with feelings of peacefulness and relief. By going through this process, they were making connections and putting pieces of their lives together in a meaningful way. There were mixed reports regarding whether the life review facilitated resolution of conflicts and issues. A larger controlled study should be conducted, with extended time for patient reflection.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLife Review at End of Life: Measures of Outcomes, A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151369-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Life Review at End of Life: Measures of Outcomes, A Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Butler, Frieda R., PhD, RN, MPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">George Mason University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fbutler@gmu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Amani Babgi, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of a life review intervention with terminally ill elderly persons to facilitate a peaceful end of life. Peaceful end of life was defined as having: 1. recognition of one?s having had a purpose in life, 2. an intuitive understanding of self, 3. possessing a sense of self determination, 4. reconciliation of issues of forgiveness, and 5. acceptance of one?s own death.&nbsp; A mixed methods approach consisted of 1. conducting a life review &nbsp;of hospice patients in their homes using The Life Review and Experiencing Guide (Haight, 1992); 2. administering a modified 5-point LAP-R Likert Scale, (Reker, 1994); and 3. conducting a post life review interview using a guide developed by the PI to determine the outcomes of the life review. Results showed that all of the participants perceived the life review as an enjoyable experience and half of these indicated feelings of peacefulness and completeness as a result of the life review. All but one subject stated that this procedure was helpful. Participants scored higher on the LAP-R dimensions of: 1. meaning and purpose in life, on choice/responsibleness, and on 3. death acceptance. Mean scores on these dimensions ranged from 3.67 ? 5.00. They scored lowest on items indicating achievement of life?s goals and fulfillment, withdrawal from life, and perceiving life as boring and uneventful. Mean scores on these items ranged from 1.50-3.83. Conclusions:&nbsp; The intervention of a life review provided the majority of participants with feelings of peacefulness and relief. By going through this process, they were making connections and putting pieces of their lives together in a meaningful way. There were mixed reports regarding whether the life review facilitated resolution of conflicts and issues. A larger controlled study should be conducted, with extended time for patient reflection.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:00:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:00:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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