2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151377
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Correlational Study of Children's Experiences of Procedural Pain
Abstract:
A Correlational Study of Children's Experiences of Procedural Pain
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Cheng, Su-Fen, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Fooyin University
Co-Authors:Pei-rong Chang, RN, MS; Chi-Chun Chin, RN, PhD; Shih-Hsien Kuo, RPh, PhD; Hui-Ling Liou, BSN
Pain is the most common problem for which patients in clinical settings seek help. In Taiwan, almost all Taiwanese hospitalized children receive intravenous therapies, which remain at the site until been discharged from hospitals. Cheng (2002) found that hospitalized children in Taiwan had medium procedural pain. In clinical, it is not difficult to find pain reactions, fear and distress during the process of intravenous injection. If the intervention only focuses on pain reactions, procedural pain may not be able to be relieved. Thus, the purposes of this study are to explore the relationship among children?s experiences of procedural pain, fear and distress reactions toward intravenous therapy. This is a descriptive correlational design. A total of 191 children aged 4-11 years old who were hospitalized with procedural pain were purposefully recruited in this study. All children were asked to report the intensity of their procedural pain using Cheng and Chang (2005) pain rating scale and to complete the procedural fear scale and questionnaire. The pain intensity scales were measured children?s overall pain, procedural pain expectation, procedural pain acceptance, previous worst procedural pain. The results of this study revealed that children experienced medium pain during intravenous injection. Current procedural pain intensity was positive correlated with procedural pain expectation, fear during intravenous injection and procedural pain acceptance, and explain 36.9% of variance. Although we cannot decrease children?s expectation pain which is associated with previous pain experience, we can decrease children?s fear in relation to intravenous injection. The result of this study expanded the understanding of factors related to children?s procedural pain, especially procedural pain expectation, and demonstrated the need to include pain expectation as a variable in future research. The results also supported the recommendation for research, practice and education.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Correlational Study of Children's Experiences of Procedural Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151377-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Correlational Study of Children's Experiences of Procedural Pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cheng, Su-Fen, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Fooyin University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sv132@mail.fy.edu.tw</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Pei-rong Chang, RN, MS; Chi-Chun Chin, RN, PhD; Shih-Hsien Kuo, RPh, PhD; Hui-Ling Liou, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pain is the most common problem for which patients in clinical settings seek help. In Taiwan, almost all Taiwanese hospitalized children receive intravenous therapies, which remain at the site until been discharged from hospitals. Cheng (2002) found that hospitalized children in Taiwan had medium procedural pain. In clinical, it is not difficult to find pain reactions, fear and distress during the process of intravenous injection. If the intervention only focuses on pain reactions, procedural pain may not be able to be relieved. Thus, the purposes of this study are to explore the relationship among children?s experiences of procedural pain, fear and distress reactions toward intravenous therapy. This is a descriptive correlational design. A total of 191 children aged 4-11 years old who were hospitalized with procedural pain were purposefully recruited in this study. All children were asked to report the intensity of their procedural pain using Cheng and Chang (2005) pain rating scale and to complete the procedural fear scale and questionnaire. The pain intensity scales were measured children?s overall pain, procedural pain expectation, procedural pain acceptance, previous worst procedural pain. The results of this study revealed that children experienced medium pain during intravenous injection. Current procedural pain intensity was positive correlated with procedural pain expectation, fear during intravenous injection and procedural pain acceptance, and explain 36.9% of variance. Although we cannot decrease children?s expectation pain which is associated with previous pain experience, we can decrease children?s fear in relation to intravenous injection. The result of this study expanded the understanding of factors related to children?s procedural pain, especially procedural pain expectation, and demonstrated the need to include pain expectation as a variable in future research. The results also supported the recommendation for research, practice and education.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:00:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:00:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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