2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151379
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Research Residency: Evidence-based Practice
Abstract:
Nursing Research Residency: Evidence-based Practice
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Cobb, Sarah E., RN, MS
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Florida
Title:Nursing Research Resident
Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a problem-solving method that merges the best available scientific evidence with clinical expertise, while at the same time respecting the patients? values and cultural preferences. One of the roles of the nursing research resident is to foster a culture of research so that nurses can connect the research evidence to nursing practice. The use of quality driven outcome-oriented standards demands that research under-gird those standards. Nurses who do not have a research-oriented background can be mentored in the culture of research. Recent research has shown that 67% of nurses seek information from colleagues rather than seek evidence in references, and 77% had never received instruction in the use of electronic resources. Strategies for accomplishing a culture of inquiry include writing self-initiated educational prescriptions to bridge the knowledge gap, using clinical coaching or holding research study groups to develop research skills, and having groups for assessing clinical evidence (ACE).  Other strategies are doing posters showing ?critically-appraised topics? with comments about the applicability to the unit, and doing evidence-based rounds to engage a larger level of practitioners. Barriers to implementing EBP in clinical settings include time, money, other priorities, and the lack of an infrastructure to support the culture of inquiry. And while the body of evidence appears quite large, the reality is that much of the evidence is not accessible to the bedside nurse, either through poor searching skills or through restricted sources of evidence. These barriers can be surmounted with education and training. The nursing research resident is in the strategic position to do so.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Research Residency: Evidence-based Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151379-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Research Residency: Evidence-based Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cobb, Sarah E., RN, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing Research Resident</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">secobb2@mail.usf.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a problem-solving method that merges the best available scientific evidence with clinical expertise, while at the same time respecting the patients? values and cultural preferences. One of the roles of the nursing research resident is to foster a culture of research so that nurses can connect the research evidence to nursing practice. The use of quality driven outcome-oriented standards demands that research under-gird those standards. Nurses who do not have a research-oriented background can be mentored in the culture of research. Recent research has shown that 67% of nurses seek information from colleagues rather than seek evidence in references, and 77% had never received instruction in the use of electronic resources. Strategies for accomplishing a culture of inquiry include writing self-initiated educational prescriptions to bridge the knowledge gap, using clinical coaching or holding research study groups to develop research skills, and having groups for assessing clinical evidence (ACE).&nbsp; Other strategies are doing posters showing ?critically-appraised topics? with comments about the applicability to the unit, and doing evidence-based rounds to engage a larger level of practitioners. Barriers to implementing EBP in clinical settings include time, money, other priorities, and the lack of an infrastructure to support the culture of inquiry. And while the body of evidence appears quite large, the reality is that much of the evidence is not accessible to the bedside nurse, either through poor searching skills or through restricted sources of evidence. These barriers can be surmounted with education and training. The nursing research resident is in the strategic position to do so.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:00:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:00:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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