2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151388
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Attitudes Toward Safety and Reported Medication Errors
Abstract:
Nurses' Attitudes Toward Safety and Reported Medication Errors
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Duthie, Elizabeth A., MA
P.I. Institution Name:NYU Hospitals Center
Title:Director of Patient Safety
Nursing has traditionally viewed medication errors as a reflection of poor nursing practice or as a quality indicator. In industry high rates of error reporting are an indicator of a safety vigilant staff.  There is a paucity of studies in nursing that have examined medication errors to determine if medication errors are an indicator of poor quality or of a safety vigilant staff. This study used a non-experimental, descriptive design to examine the relation between reported rates of medication errors and a nursing unit?s attitudes towards safety in an academic urban medical center. Nurses attitudes about a safety climate were measured using the Safety Climate Survey (SCS) tool with individual nurses? responses combined to obtain a score for each nursing unit. Quality indicators (patient satisfaction, falls, pressure ulcers and complaint letters), workload intensity measures (case mix index and medication doses per patient) and staffing co-variates (vacancy rates, hours per patient day and new RN hires) were correlated to the SCS. The lack of correlation between the QI and reported medication error rates suggests that medication errors are not a QI. Study units with low SCS report low numbers of medication errors. The factors that are correlated to medication error reporting are numbers of new nurses, case mix index (CMI) and doses of medications administered. SCS was negatively correlated to pressure ulcers. The information from this study should provide support for Nurse Executives endeavoring to create a safety climate. Units that have high numbers of new nurses and high workload intensity (CMI and high numbers of medication doses) are vulnerable to medication errors and may need additional supports to ensure safety. Units that have a positive safety culture have fewer pressure ulcers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Attitudes Toward Safety and Reported Medication Errorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151388-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses' Attitudes Toward Safety and Reported Medication Errors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Duthie, Elizabeth A., MA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">NYU Hospitals Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Patient Safety</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">beth.duthie@nyumc.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing has traditionally viewed medication errors as a reflection of poor nursing practice or as a quality indicator. In industry high rates of error reporting are an indicator of a safety vigilant staff.&nbsp; There is a paucity of studies in nursing that have examined medication errors to determine if medication errors are an indicator of poor quality or of a safety vigilant staff. This study used a non-experimental, descriptive design to examine the relation between reported rates of medication errors and a nursing unit?s attitudes towards safety in an academic urban medical center. Nurses attitudes about a safety climate were measured using the Safety Climate Survey (SCS) tool with individual nurses? responses combined to obtain a score for each nursing unit. Quality indicators (patient satisfaction, falls, pressure ulcers and complaint letters), workload intensity measures (case mix index and medication doses per patient) and staffing co-variates (vacancy rates, hours per patient day and new RN hires) were correlated to the SCS. The lack of correlation between the QI and reported medication error rates suggests that medication errors are not a QI. Study units with low SCS report low numbers of medication errors. The factors that are correlated to medication error reporting are numbers of new nurses, case mix index (CMI) and doses of medications administered. SCS was negatively correlated to pressure ulcers. The information from this study should provide support for Nurse Executives endeavoring to create a safety climate. Units that have high numbers of new nurses and high workload intensity (CMI and high numbers of medication doses) are vulnerable to medication errors and may need additional supports to ensure safety. Units that have a positive safety culture have fewer pressure ulcers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:00:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:00:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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