Evidence-Based Web Site Design for Pregnant Low Income African-American Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151394
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evidence-Based Web Site Design for Pregnant Low Income African-American Women
Abstract:
Evidence-Based Web Site Design for Pregnant Low Income African-American Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Herman, JoAnne, PhD, RN, CSME
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Carolina
Title:Associate Professor
The Internet and World Wide Web (WWW) are powerful tools for dissemination of health information because the Internet can be accessed anytime, provides a less stressful mode of communication with relative anonymity, and allows participants to work at their own pace. A comprehensive web site includes information, peer support, expert advice, and activities to help clients make decisions and plan behavior. The challenge is to design each of these components so clients want to access the information, can read and understand the information, easily move around the web site, and use the more sophisticated decision-making components. Researchers have expressed concern about the ability of low income, lesser educated and/or minority individuals to effectively access and use information from the WWW. The purpose of this presentation is to combine findings from the literature, findings from two studies I have conducted, and personal experience to determine guidelines for the design of web sites for low income African American women. Participants in my studies were low income, pregnant African American women who were unmarried and unemployed living in rural areas. Findings indicated that the women would access a web site but they had specific preferences. Guidelines include using easy-to-read language, simplifying navigation, maximizing use of the discussion board, providing culturally appropriate pages, tailoring information, and giving the participants input into the design of web pages.   .
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvidence-Based Web Site Design for Pregnant Low Income African-American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151394-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evidence-Based Web Site Design for Pregnant Low Income African-American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Herman, JoAnne, PhD, RN, CSME</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Carolina</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joanne.herman@sc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Internet and World Wide Web (WWW) are powerful tools for dissemination of health information because the Internet can be accessed anytime, provides a less stressful mode of communication with relative anonymity, and allows participants to work at their own pace. A comprehensive web site includes information, peer support, expert advice, and activities to help clients make decisions and plan behavior. The challenge is to design each of these components so clients want to access the information, can read and understand the information, easily move around the web site, and use the more sophisticated decision-making components. Researchers have expressed concern about the ability of low income, lesser educated and/or minority individuals to effectively access and use information from the WWW. The purpose of this presentation is to combine findings from the literature, findings from two studies I have conducted, and personal experience to determine guidelines for the design of web sites for low income African American women. Participants in my studies were low income, pregnant African American women who were unmarried and unemployed living in rural areas. Findings indicated that the women would access a web site but they had specific preferences. Guidelines include using easy-to-read language, simplifying navigation, maximizing use of the discussion board, providing culturally appropriate pages, tailoring information, and giving the participants input into the design of web pages. &nbsp;&nbsp;.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:00:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:00:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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