2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151402
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Families of NICU Patients
Abstract:
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Families of NICU Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Ikuta, Linda MacKenna, MN, RN, CCNS
P.I. Institution Name:Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford University Medical Center
Title:Neonatal Clinical Nurse Specialist
Objective: This study examined the prevalence of acute stress disorder (ASD) in parents of infants who were patients in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It also examined the relationship of ASD to parental stress, sociodemographic and medical variables, quality of the family environment, and parental coping style. Methods: Forty parents of infants hospitalized in the NICU were assessed two to four weeks following the birth of their infants. Parents completed measures of their ASD symptoms (the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire) and stress related to their NICU experience (Parental Stressor Scale: NICU). Parents also completed measures to assess the quality of the family environment (Family Environment Scale) and parental coping style (Weinberger Adjustment Inventory). Results: Twenty-eight percent of parents developed symptoms of ASD. Risk factors for poor outcome included female gender and younger age. Significant parental distress was related to alteration in the expected parental role. Less family cohesion was associated with greater severity of ASD symptoms. Parents with a coping style of restraint, and those classified as suppressors were more likely to develop symptoms of ASD. Conclusions: Parents of infants hospitalized in the NICU are at particular risk of developing ASD related to the stress of their NICU experience. Family environment and parental coping style are significantly associated with the development of trauma symptoms. Results from this study suggest potential interventions to help minimize parental psychological distress.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePost-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Families of NICU Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151402-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Families of NICU Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ikuta, Linda MacKenna, MN, RN, CCNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford University Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Neonatal Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">likuta@lpch.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This study examined the prevalence of acute stress disorder (ASD) in parents of infants who were patients in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It also examined the relationship of ASD to parental stress, sociodemographic and medical variables, quality of the family environment, and parental coping style. Methods: Forty parents of infants hospitalized in the NICU were assessed two to four weeks following the birth of their infants. Parents completed measures of their ASD symptoms (the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire) and stress related to their NICU experience (Parental Stressor Scale: NICU). Parents also completed measures to assess the quality of the family environment (Family Environment Scale) and parental coping style (Weinberger Adjustment Inventory). Results: Twenty-eight percent of parents developed symptoms of ASD. Risk factors for poor outcome included female gender and younger age. Significant parental distress was related to alteration in the expected parental role. Less family cohesion was associated with greater severity of ASD symptoms. Parents with a coping style of restraint, and those classified as suppressors were more likely to develop symptoms of ASD. Conclusions: Parents of infants hospitalized in the NICU are at particular risk of developing ASD related to the stress of their NICU experience. Family environment and parental coping style are significantly associated with the development of trauma symptoms. Results from this study suggest potential interventions to help minimize parental psychological distress.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:01:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:01:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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