2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151409
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Defining an Evidence-Based Environment for Nursing Practice
Abstract:
Defining an Evidence-Based Environment for Nursing Practice
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Kotzer, Anne Marie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The Children's Hospital and University of Colorado School of Nursing
Title:Nurse Researcher and Associate Professor
Background/Purpose: A direct relationship has been demonstrated between job satisfaction, retention, turnover, patient safety and elements of the nurses' work environment. Administrative efforts to alter the work environment may not be consistent with nurses' assessment of what is important. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare staff nurses' perceptions of their real and their ideal work setting. Methods: Using a descriptive survey design, a convenience sample of 385 nurses on five inpatient units and the float team at a pediatric hospital answered a demographics questionnaire and the Work Environment Scale (WES) (Moos, 1994). The WES consists of ten subscales within three dimensions: Relationship (involvement, peer cohesion, supervisor support), Personal Growth (autonomy, task orientation, work pressure), and System Maintenance and Change (clarity, control, innovation, physical comfort). Two assessment forms measured the real (R) or current work environment and the ideal (I) or preferred work environment. Findings: The overall response rate was 40%. The majority of nurses worked full-time, ranged in age from 20 to 35 years, and worked as an RN < 6 years. Possible scores ranged from 0 ? 9. Units reported high levels of Involvement, Peer Cohesion, Task Orientation, and Managerial Control (6 to 9). Scores for Work Pressure and Autonomy were moderate-high (3 to <9) and Physical Comfort, Supervisor Support, Clarity and Innovation were moderate (3 to <6). Across all units, Involvement scored highest and Physical Comfort lowest. Statistically significant differences were seen between all real and ideal subscale scores except for Managerial Control on three units. Implications: Despite moderate work pressure reported, staff affirmed a highly positive work environment on their units. Significant differences between real and ideal subscale scores suggest opportunities for targeted interventions. Plans are underway to identify and prioritize areas for improvement, establish goals, and develop action plans for change.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDefining an Evidence-Based Environment for Nursing Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151409-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Defining an Evidence-Based Environment for Nursing Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kotzer, Anne Marie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Children's Hospital and University of Colorado School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Researcher and Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kotzer.annemarie@tchden.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background/Purpose: A direct relationship has been demonstrated between job satisfaction, retention, turnover, patient safety and elements of the nurses' work environment. Administrative efforts to alter the work environment may not be consistent with nurses' assessment of what is important. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare staff nurses' perceptions of their real and their ideal work setting. Methods: Using a descriptive survey design, a convenience sample of 385 nurses on five inpatient units and the float team at a pediatric hospital answered a demographics questionnaire and the Work Environment Scale (WES) (Moos, 1994). The WES consists of ten subscales within three dimensions: Relationship (involvement, peer cohesion, supervisor support), Personal Growth (autonomy, task orientation, work pressure), and System Maintenance and Change (clarity, control, innovation, physical comfort). Two assessment forms measured the real (R) or current work environment and the ideal (I) or preferred work environment. Findings: The overall response rate was 40%. The majority of nurses worked full-time, ranged in age from 20 to 35 years, and worked as an RN &lt; 6 years. Possible scores ranged from 0 ? 9. Units reported high levels of Involvement, Peer Cohesion, Task Orientation, and Managerial Control (6 to 9). Scores for Work Pressure and Autonomy were moderate-high (3 to &lt;9) and Physical Comfort, Supervisor Support, Clarity and Innovation were moderate (3 to &lt;6). Across all units, Involvement scored highest and Physical Comfort lowest. Statistically significant differences were seen between all real and ideal subscale scores except for Managerial Control on three units. Implications: Despite moderate work pressure reported, staff affirmed a highly positive work environment on their units. Significant differences between real and ideal subscale scores suggest opportunities for targeted interventions. Plans are underway to identify and prioritize areas for improvement, establish goals, and develop action plans for change.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:01:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:01:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.