Early Administration of Oral Analgesia Following General Anesthesia in Ambulatory Surgery Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151412
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Early Administration of Oral Analgesia Following General Anesthesia in Ambulatory Surgery Patients
Abstract:
Early Administration of Oral Analgesia Following General Anesthesia in Ambulatory Surgery Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lancaster, Kelly E., RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Maine Medical Center
Significance: Researchers have extensively studied pain scales, multimodal and pre-emptive analgesia but have not studied the timing of oral postoperative analgesic administration. Current clinical practice is based on trial and error and myths and misconceptions rather than evidence-based research. In the absence of sufficient research, the practice is based on anecdotal information and expert opinion, resulting in wide variations. The purpose of this study is to determine if early administration of oral analgesia and oral fluids following general anesthesia in ambulatory surgery patients affects the occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting, level of pain and length of stay compared to patients that received later administration of oral analgesia and oral fluids. Methods: Anecdotally in our ambulatory surgery setting, early oral analgesia administration has shown some success in improving outcomes related to pain control and length of stay without a noticeable effect on the occurrence of nausea and vomiting. Unable to find existing external evidence regarding the practice of oral analgesia and /or oral fluid initiation, a retrospective data collection from 1,150 charts of adult general surgery patients receiving general anesthesia for ambulatory surgical procedures was performed. Outcomes Evaluation: Data synthesis is in process and final results will be presented at the conference. Outcome results will compare level of pain, occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting and length of stay in early analgesia / oral fluid administration compared to late oral analgesia /oral fluid administration. Implications for Practice: The early administration of oral analgesia and oral fluids in the postoperative period may affect pain, nausea and vomiting, recovery, and discharge from the day surgery unit.  Practices that affect pain, PONV and length of stay in PACU and ASU can have a  patient benefit as well as cost benefit effect on the units as well.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEarly Administration of Oral Analgesia Following General Anesthesia in Ambulatory Surgery Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151412-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Early Administration of Oral Analgesia Following General Anesthesia in Ambulatory Surgery Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lancaster, Kelly E., RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Maine Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lancak@mmc.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Significance:&nbsp;Researchers have extensively studied pain scales, multimodal and pre-emptive analgesia but have not studied the timing of oral postoperative analgesic administration. Current clinical practice is based on trial and error and myths and misconceptions rather than evidence-based research. In the absence of sufficient research, the practice is based on anecdotal information and expert opinion, resulting in wide variations.&nbsp;The purpose of this study is to determine if early administration of oral analgesia and oral fluids following general anesthesia in ambulatory surgery patients affects the occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting, level of pain and length of stay compared to patients that received later administration of oral analgesia and oral fluids. Methods: Anecdotally in our ambulatory surgery setting, early oral analgesia administration has shown some success in improving outcomes related to pain control and length of stay without a noticeable effect on the occurrence of nausea and vomiting. Unable to find existing external evidence regarding the practice of oral analgesia and /or oral fluid initiation, a retrospective data collection from 1,150 charts of adult general surgery patients receiving general anesthesia for ambulatory surgical procedures was performed. Outcomes Evaluation: Data synthesis is in process and final results will be presented at the conference. Outcome results will compare level of pain, occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting and length of stay in early analgesia / oral fluid administration compared to late oral analgesia /oral fluid administration. Implications for Practice: The early administration of oral analgesia and oral fluids in the postoperative period may affect pain, nausea and vomiting, recovery, and discharge from the day surgery unit.&nbsp; Practices that affect pain, PONV and length of stay in PACU and ASU can have a&nbsp; patient benefit as well as cost benefit effect on the units as well.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:01:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:01:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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