2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151413
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining the Role of Social Context in Nurses' Pain Assessment Practice
Abstract:
Examining the Role of Social Context in Nurses' Pain Assessment Practice
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lauzon Clabo, Laurie M., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Rhode Island
Title:Assistant Professor
Purpose: Inadequately managed postoperative pain is associated with negative client outcomes, yet empirical data demonstrate that nurses frequently use inaccurate assessment criteria and clients report inadequate pain management.  While the nursing unit environment has been described as a barrier to pain assessment and management, almost no empirical work has directly examined the impact of the practice setting on individual practice.  Therefore, this study was designed to describe the impact of the sociocultural context of the practice setting on nurses? assessment of postoperative clients' pain.  Method: This ethnographic study was conducted simultaneously on two postoperative units at a teaching hospital in New England.  Using classic ethnographic techniques, data collection and analysis were conducted in distinct phases designed to address: (1) the nature of the sociocultural field of nursing pain assessment practice in each unit; (2) the specific assessment strategies used in each field; and (3) differences in nursing pain assessment practice between fields.  Data collection methods included participant observation; in-depth interviews with nurses; focus groups, and a quantitative instrument.  Findings: A predominant pattern of pain assessment was observed on each unit.  Nurses used assessment criteria from three spheres including the client?s narrative of pain, evident criteria demonstrated by the client and a reference typology of expected pain assessment findings.  Nurses demonstrated use of a single sphere of criteria as a primary filter through which data from the other two spheres was processed.  This filter was distinctive for each unit, and was consistent with the two unique patterns of nursing pain assessment demonstrated on the two units.  Conclusions: In this study, nurses' pain assessment practice was clearly shaped by the sociocultural context of the specific nursing unit on which practice occurred.  Interventions aimed at improving pain assessment should address the nature of the nursing unit environment and its? impact on the individual nurse.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining the Role of Social Context in Nurses' Pain Assessment Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151413-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examining the Role of Social Context in Nurses' Pain Assessment Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lauzon Clabo, Laurie M., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Rhode Island</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">llauzonclabo@uri.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Inadequately managed postoperative pain is associated with negative client outcomes, yet empirical data demonstrate that nurses frequently use inaccurate assessment criteria and clients report inadequate pain management.&nbsp; While the nursing unit environment has been described as a barrier to pain assessment and management, almost no empirical work has directly examined the impact of the practice setting on individual practice.&nbsp; Therefore, this study was designed to describe the impact of the sociocultural context of the practice setting on nurses? assessment of postoperative clients' pain.&nbsp; Method: This ethnographic study was conducted simultaneously on two postoperative units at a teaching hospital in New England.&nbsp; Using classic ethnographic techniques, data collection and analysis were conducted in distinct phases designed to address: (1) the nature of the sociocultural field of nursing pain assessment practice in each unit; (2) the specific assessment strategies used in each field; and (3) differences in nursing pain assessment practice between fields.&nbsp; Data collection methods included participant observation; in-depth interviews with nurses; focus groups, and a quantitative instrument.&nbsp; Findings: A predominant pattern of pain assessment was observed on each unit.&nbsp; Nurses used assessment criteria from three spheres including the client?s narrative of pain, evident criteria demonstrated by the client and a reference typology of expected pain assessment findings.&nbsp; Nurses demonstrated use of a single sphere of criteria as a primary filter through which data from the other two spheres was processed. &nbsp;This filter was distinctive for each unit, and was consistent with the two unique patterns of nursing pain assessment demonstrated on the two units.&nbsp; Conclusions: In this study, nurses' pain assessment practice was clearly shaped by the sociocultural context of the specific nursing unit on which practice occurred.&nbsp; Interventions aimed at improving pain assessment should address the nature of the nursing unit environment and its? impact on the individual nurse.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:01:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:01:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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