Symptomatology and Self-Care Practices Related to Quality of Life in Persons with HIV/AIDS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151433
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptomatology and Self-Care Practices Related to Quality of Life in Persons with HIV/AIDS
Abstract:
Symptomatology and Self-Care Practices Related to Quality of Life in Persons with HIV/AIDS
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Peterson-Mitchell, Ginger K., RN, BSN, MS, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:United States Navy
Title:Nurse Manager
Objective: The primary objective of this study, via secondary analysis, was to determine the relationships among reported symptoms (i.e., anxiety, depression, and fatigue), the use of self-care practices (i.e., complementary and alternative medicine, activities/thoughts, and exercise), and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in persons with HIV/AIDS. Methods: A descriptive design was used to obtain information from 372 HIV-infected subjects in an outpatient clinic in southeast Texas. Participants completed a sociodemographic data form, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Living With HIV/AIDS Scale (LIV), Revised Sign and Symptom Check-List for HIV (SSC-HIV rev), and Self-Care Symptom Management for People Living with HIV/AIDS (SSM). The CES-D is a 20-item self-report scale designed to measure depressive symptomatology. The 38-item LIV Scale measures HRQOL. Items on the SSC-HIVrev consisted of 72 items with possible scores ranging from ?0? (blank) to ?3? (severe). Using the SSM, participants were asked to identify self-care activities used to manage reported symptoms, frequency of use, and perceived effectiveness. Results: Sociodemographic attributes of the sample (n=372) were between the ages of 18 and 66 years, with a mean age of 39.98 (+ 8.27). The participants were comprised of 250 (67.2%) males and 118 (31.7%) females with 4(1%) transgender. Approximately 72% were African American, 15% Caucasian, and 9% Latino/Hispanic. Clients used a large number of self-care activities, with activity/thoughts, exercise, and complementary/alternative medicine being among the most frequently reported. There was a negative correlation (r = -0.258, p = 0.010) between ethnicity and talking with family/friends with a positive correlation (r = 0.223, p = 0.028) between gender and talking with others on the symptom of anxiety. Conclusions: A positive relationship was correlated between age and gender with the variables of anxiety and depression with a significant relationship between the variables of depression and fatigue and HRQOL.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptomatology and Self-Care Practices Related to Quality of Life in Persons with HIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151433-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symptomatology and Self-Care Practices Related to Quality of Life in Persons with HIV/AIDS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Peterson-Mitchell, Ginger K., RN, BSN, MS, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">United States Navy</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gkpeterson@nhlem.med.navy.mil</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The primary objective of this study, via secondary analysis, was to determine the relationships among reported symptoms (i.e., anxiety, depression, and fatigue), the use of self-care practices (i.e., complementary and alternative medicine, activities/thoughts, and exercise), and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in persons with HIV/AIDS. Methods: A descriptive design was used to obtain information from 372 HIV-infected subjects in an outpatient clinic in southeast Texas. Participants completed a sociodemographic data form, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Living With HIV/AIDS Scale (LIV), Revised Sign and Symptom Check-List for HIV (SSC-HIV rev), and Self-Care Symptom Management for People Living with HIV/AIDS (SSM). The CES-D is a 20-item self-report scale designed to measure depressive symptomatology. The 38-item LIV Scale measures HRQOL. Items on the SSC-HIVrev consisted of 72 items with possible scores ranging from ?0? (blank) to ?3? (severe). Using the SSM, participants were asked to identify self-care activities used to manage reported symptoms, frequency of use, and perceived effectiveness. Results: Sociodemographic attributes of the sample (n=372) were between the ages of 18 and 66 years, with a mean age of 39.98 (+ 8.27). The participants were comprised of 250 (67.2%) males and 118 (31.7%) females with 4(1%) transgender. Approximately 72% were African American, 15% Caucasian, and 9% Latino/Hispanic. Clients used a large number of self-care activities, with activity/thoughts, exercise, and complementary/alternative medicine being among the most frequently reported. There was a negative correlation (r = -0.258,&nbsp;p = 0.010) between ethnicity and talking with family/friends with a positive correlation (r = 0.223, p = 0.028) between gender and talking with others on the symptom of anxiety. Conclusions: A positive relationship was correlated between age and gender with the variables of anxiety and depression with a significant relationship between the variables of depression and fatigue and HRQOL.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:02:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:02:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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