The Comparison of Work Satisfaction of Active and Inactive Registered Nurses with Implication for Retention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151447
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Comparison of Work Satisfaction of Active and Inactive Registered Nurses with Implication for Retention
Abstract:
The Comparison of Work Satisfaction of Active and Inactive Registered Nurses with Implication for Retention
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Roussel, Linda Ann, DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Alabama
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Kimberly A. Williams, DNSc
This study is seeking to understand at what point the active RN leaves a facility for another facility or completely leaves the profession of nursing and what factors contribute to nurses remain in their current jobs. RNs are taking care of sicker patients, for longer hours, and with inadequate resources.  In 2004 there were 938 inactive RNs in Mississippi, of these 416 were randomly selected to receive a survey, which inquired to the possibility of the inactive nurse returning to the workforce, the satisfaction of their last nursing job, and reason that they left nursing.  A large portion of participants stated their reasons for leaving nursing were related to parenting duties, length of shifts and salary.  A major portion of respondents indicated they would return and be willing to return to a part-time position. Returning to nursing can create possibly new problems that need to be addressed, such as refresher courses and accommodations for those that may be disabled.  Evidence supports that more job stress results in lower group cohesion, lower work satisfaction, and higher than anticipated turnover. This study will build on the above study by using data and methodological triangulation. The goals of triangulation and of this research are to validate and achieve a deeper understanding of the concepts of quality of work satisfaction and retention in inactive nurses and of nurses considering an inactive status. Using focus groups with registered active and inactive nurses and semi-structured interviews with nurse administrators, the researchers will specifically address work satisfaction, future desires and plans to remain in nursing.  Administrative nurses? perception of their roles and responsibilities of retention will also be included in data collection.  A continued education program will be sponsored for participants after the focus groups and interviews.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Comparison of Work Satisfaction of Active and Inactive Registered Nurses with Implication for Retentionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151447-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Comparison of Work Satisfaction of Active and Inactive Registered Nurses with Implication for Retention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Roussel, Linda Ann, DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Alabama</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lroussel@usouthal.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kimberly A. Williams, DNSc</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study is seeking to understand at what point the active RN leaves a facility for another facility or completely leaves the profession of nursing and what factors contribute to nurses remain in their current jobs. RNs are taking care of sicker patients, for longer hours, and with inadequate resources.&nbsp; In 2004 there were 938 inactive RNs in Mississippi, of these 416 were randomly selected to receive a survey, which inquired to the possibility of the inactive nurse returning to the workforce, the satisfaction of their last nursing job, and reason that they left nursing.&nbsp; A large portion of participants stated their reasons for leaving nursing were related to parenting duties, length of shifts and salary.&nbsp; A major portion of respondents indicated they would return and be willing to return to a part-time position.&nbsp;Returning to nursing can create possibly new problems that need to be addressed, such as refresher courses and accommodations for those that may be disabled.&nbsp; Evidence supports that more job stress results in lower group cohesion, lower work satisfaction, and higher than anticipated turnover. This study will build on the above study by using data and methodological triangulation.&nbsp;The goals of triangulation and of this research are to validate and achieve a deeper understanding of the concepts of quality of work satisfaction and retention in inactive nurses and of nurses considering an inactive status. Using focus groups with registered active and inactive nurses and semi-structured interviews with nurse administrators, the researchers will specifically address work satisfaction, future desires and plans to remain in nursing.&nbsp; Administrative nurses? perception of their roles and responsibilities of retention will also be included in data collection.&nbsp; A continued education program will be sponsored for participants after the focus groups and interviews.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:02:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:02:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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