Telephone Support for Mothers of Children with Mental Illness: What Mothers Discuss

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151448
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Telephone Support for Mothers of Children with Mental Illness: What Mothers Discuss
Abstract:
Telephone Support for Mothers of Children with Mental Illness: What Mothers Discuss
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Scharer, Kathleen, PhD, MS, BS
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Carolina
Title:Associate Professor and Interim Associate Dean for Research
Co-Authors:Linda D. Moneyham, DNS, RN; Shirley Huisman-Jezowski, PhD, MSW, BA
Purpose:  When children with mental illness behave in unsafe ways, or are unmanageable, mothers typically bring them to the hospital for treatment with the expectation that their children will improve. However, with today?s brief hospitalizations, the children return home with little improvement. As a result, mothers are frustrated and wonder why they bothered with hospitalization. The purpose of the study was to test two different interventions aimed at providing increased support for these mothers. The mothers? responses to the telephone intervention are discussed in this paper. Method: The larger study was a quasi-experimental design, with three randomized groups: a web-based social support intervention group, a telephone social support intervention group and a control group. The data used for this presentation were from a sub-sample of the telephone social support intervention group. Mothers were called every two weeks by an experienced psychiatric registered nurse to discuss the child?s progress and how the mother was managing. The registered nurse provided information and helped the mother find more effective coping strategies. The telephone calls were recorded. These data were analyzed using content analysis. Findings:  Some common themes were identified. These include lack of services, inadequate funding for mental health care, impact of the child?s problems on the family, family financial problems, and the mother?s frustrations and sense of isolation. Discussion:  Mothers are typically the primary caregivers. They experience isolation from other mothers due to their child?s isolation from peers.  If they are employed, their workday may be frequently interrupted by calls from the school about the child?s behavior.  Mothers are desperate for assistance but rarely have good options within their own communities.  For many of the mothers, the telephone support nurse becomes a lifeline in adjusting to the difficulties in raising a mentally ill child. Implications for nursing practice are included.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTelephone Support for Mothers of Children with Mental Illness: What Mothers Discussen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151448-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Telephone Support for Mothers of Children with Mental Illness: What Mothers Discuss</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scharer, Kathleen, PhD, MS, BS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Carolina</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Interim Associate Dean for Research</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kathleen.scharer@sc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda D. Moneyham, DNS, RN; Shirley Huisman-Jezowski, PhD, MSW, BA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose:&nbsp; When children with mental illness behave in unsafe ways, or are unmanageable, mothers typically bring them to the hospital for treatment with the expectation that their children will improve. However, with today?s brief hospitalizations, the children return home with little improvement. As a result, mothers are frustrated and wonder why they bothered with hospitalization. The purpose of the study was to test two different interventions aimed at providing increased support for these mothers. The mothers? responses to the telephone intervention are discussed in this paper. Method: The larger study was a quasi-experimental design, with three randomized groups: a web-based social support intervention group, a telephone social support intervention group and a control group. The data used for this presentation were from a sub-sample of the telephone social support intervention group. Mothers were called every two weeks by an experienced psychiatric registered nurse to discuss the child?s progress and how the mother was managing. The registered nurse provided information and helped the mother find more effective coping strategies. The telephone calls were recorded. These data were analyzed using content analysis. Findings:&nbsp; Some common themes were identified. These include lack of services, inadequate funding for mental health care, impact of the child?s problems on the family, family financial problems, and the mother?s frustrations and sense of isolation. Discussion: &nbsp;Mothers are typically the primary caregivers. They experience isolation from other mothers due to their child?s isolation from peers.&nbsp; If they are employed, their workday may be frequently interrupted by calls from the school about the child?s behavior.&nbsp; Mothers are desperate for assistance but rarely have good options within their own communities.&nbsp; For many of the mothers, the telephone support nurse becomes a lifeline in adjusting to the difficulties in raising a mentally ill child. Implications for nursing practice are included.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:02:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:02:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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