2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151453
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Third Component of Evidence-Based Research: Patient-Related Issues!
Abstract:
The Third Component of Evidence-Based Research: Patient-Related Issues!
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Small, Leigh, PhD, RN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing and Coordinator, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program
Co-Authors:Anne Strasser, RN, MS, PNP; Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/NPP, FAAN
Currently, it is estimated that 26-30% of all American children have a BMI% >85% and thus are overweight or ?at risk? for overweight. This health epidemic has spawned a plethora of research and media coverage to support the development and testing of intervention strategies that may result in healthy weight maintenance and healthy lifestyles for children and families. Despite the amount of available information, there has been limited research conducted with young children (4-7 years of age) and their parents. Therefore, a thorough search for research conducted with school-aged children was undertaken to develop an innovative intervention strategy to be tested with young children and their parents   Recently, this evidence-based intervention was pilot tested with young preschool children identified as overweight or ?at risk? for overweight by an evaluation of risk factors and their parents (n=14). The children engaged with the material and demonstrated an understanding of this cognitive/behavioral intervention; however, the planned parent sessions resulted in a focus group meeting during which parents shared concerns and difficulties regarding their preschool children?s dietary patterns. The focus of their perceived difficulties was very different than what was expected as outlined by the available research literature. These parents were most interested in strategies to encourage their preschool child to eat as they struggled with the normal developmental stage in which young children?s appetites decline and food preferences develop. None of the parents perceived their children?s activity level to be problematic.   Often available research evidence is limited by the sample size or a specific sub-population included.  Adaptation of intervention strategies to different populations (i.e., different age groups, different cultural groups) should begin with obtaining focus group input, a step called elicitation research. Without this necessary first step of elicitation research, well-intentioned evidence-based intervention trials are less likely to result in positive findings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Third Component of Evidence-Based Research: Patient-Related Issues!en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151453-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Third Component of Evidence-Based Research: Patient-Related Issues!</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Small, Leigh, PhD, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing and Coordinator, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">leigh.small@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Anne Strasser, RN, MS, PNP; Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/NPP, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Currently, it is estimated that 26-30% of all American children have a BMI% &gt;85% and thus are overweight or ?at risk? for overweight. This health epidemic has spawned a plethora of research and media coverage to support the development and testing of intervention strategies that may result in healthy weight maintenance and healthy lifestyles for children and families. Despite the amount of available information, there has been limited research conducted with young children (4-7 years of age) and their parents. Therefore, a thorough search for research conducted with school-aged children was undertaken to develop an innovative intervention strategy to be tested with young children and their parents &nbsp; Recently, this evidence-based intervention was pilot tested with young preschool children identified as overweight or ?at risk? for overweight by an evaluation of risk factors and their parents (n=14). The children engaged with the material and demonstrated an understanding of this cognitive/behavioral intervention; however, the planned parent sessions resulted in a focus group meeting during which parents shared concerns and difficulties regarding their preschool children?s dietary patterns. The focus of their perceived difficulties was very different than what was expected as outlined by the available research literature. These parents were most interested in strategies to encourage their preschool child to eat as they struggled with the normal developmental stage in which young children?s appetites decline and food preferences develop. None of the parents perceived their children?s activity level to be problematic.&nbsp;&nbsp; Often available research evidence is limited by the sample size or a specific sub-population included.&nbsp; Adaptation of intervention strategies to different populations (i.e., different age groups, different cultural groups) should begin with obtaining focus group input, a step called elicitation research. Without this necessary first step of elicitation research, well-intentioned evidence-based intervention trials are less likely to result in positive findings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:02:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:02:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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