2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151459
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions and Experiences of Breast Cancer Survivors
Abstract:
Perceptions and Experiences of Breast Cancer Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Thomas, Eileen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:LaToya N. Usher, RN, BSN
Perceptions and Experiences of Breast Cancer Survivors  Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this investigation, Phase II of a larger ongoing study, is to elicit information about the mammography screening experiences and behaviors of women with a history of breast cancer, to identify breast cancer survivors? perceptions concerning contradictions of social systems in regards to health behaviors and self-image, and to clarify and expand on the concepts and themes derived from Phase I of this study. Background/Rationale: The lifetime risk of breast cancer has almost tripled and ethnic minority women consistently have poorer breast cancer outcomes. Late diagnosis resulting in a worse prognosis is a primary reason for the disparity in breast cancer mortality among ethnic minority women. Despite the development and implementation of interventions using behavior change models, ethnic minority women?s breast cancer screening behaviors have not substantially changed. This suggests that interventions based on current models may not be as useful as anticipated in changing minority health behaviors. Methods: Thirty-six White, African American, Hispanic, and American Indian women with a history of breast cancer are being recruited to take part in four separate focus group interviews, one focus group interview with each ethnic/racial group. Analysis of the focus group interviews will involve axial coding of the transcripts. This process will allow the investigator to identify specific examples, concepts, and themes that encompass the data obtained from within and between each ethnic/racial group. Implications: Our current health behavioral models have not considered the possibility of potentially emotional components of health-seeking behaviors, such as mammography screening. Current health behavioral models may not be sufficient as currently developed to address issues specific to ethnic minority populations. The findings from this study will lay a foundation for the development of a model that addresses ethnic minority women?s health promotion behaviors related to mammography screening.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions and Experiences of Breast Cancer Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151459-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceptions and Experiences of Breast Cancer Survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thomas, Eileen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eithomas@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">LaToya N. Usher, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Perceptions and Experiences of Breast Cancer Survivors&nbsp; Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this investigation, Phase II of a larger ongoing study, is to elicit information about the mammography screening experiences and behaviors of women with a history of breast cancer, to identify breast cancer survivors? perceptions concerning contradictions of social systems in regards to health behaviors and self-image, and to clarify and expand on the concepts and themes derived from Phase I of this study. Background/Rationale: The lifetime risk of breast cancer has almost tripled and ethnic minority women consistently have poorer breast cancer outcomes. Late diagnosis resulting in a worse prognosis is a primary reason for the disparity in breast cancer mortality among ethnic minority women. Despite the development and implementation of interventions using behavior change models, ethnic minority women?s breast cancer screening behaviors have not substantially changed. This suggests that interventions based on current models may not be as useful as anticipated in changing minority health behaviors. Methods: Thirty-six White, African American, Hispanic, and American Indian women with a history of breast cancer are being recruited to take part in four separate focus group interviews, one focus group interview with each ethnic/racial group. Analysis of the focus group interviews will involve axial coding of the transcripts. This process will allow the investigator to identify specific examples, concepts, and themes that encompass the data obtained from within and between each ethnic/racial group. Implications: Our current health behavioral models have not considered the possibility of potentially emotional components of health-seeking behaviors, such as mammography screening. Current health behavioral models may not be sufficient as currently developed to address issues specific to ethnic minority populations. The findings from this study will lay a foundation for the development of a model that addresses ethnic minority women?s health promotion behaviors related to mammography screening.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:03:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:03:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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